14 to 40: Then and Now – Part 2

In my previous post, I noted a number of things as they were in 1979 when Julianne got married.  It is absolutely amazing how things have changed in these 40 years and how these have had a profound impact on our lives.  I know that many of you reading these posts have likely had similar experiences.  But, as I try to do this countdown, and as I look back and compare to today, it behooves me to note these impacts.

Obviously, the biggest changes are all technology based.  In 1979, we had no internet, let alone, most people didn’t have computers unless they could afford the Atari 400.  By the time I began college at Northern Arizona University in the fall of 1980, there were large mainframes in use at the school.  The mass use of computers, even mainframes, was still fledgling.  By the time I got to my Master’s Program at Arizona State University, the advent of the “Personal Computer” was just beginning.  However, it was not until we returned back from Japan in 1991 that the internet was kicking into gear. A company named Quantum Computer Services, run by Steve Case, had created a bulletin board for owners of the Commodore 64 computers.  In 1991, Quantum was renamed America Online.  By 1993, AOL introduced its own email addresses, a Windows version and provided access to the rest of the brand new internet.  Being the tech geek, even back then, I jumped on board of AOL as soon as I was able. My first ever email address was sumoman@aol.com

AOL Floppy – 50 hours for free

By 1992, we had moved to Kentucky and I was working for Japanese companies as an interpreter.  Then, in late 1993 I was hired to manage a Japanese-owned Horse Farm.  The farm got a computer for managing records.  By this time I had become proficient in the early Microsoft Office products, which were available for Windows in 1990.  In April 1994, Netscape was founded and the first Search Engine/Browser came to being.  (Technically, the first one was called WorldWideWeb and was developed in 1990 for the NeXT Computer).  Anyway, that revolutionized the world and impacted our lives at a personal level.  We could then communicate with family via email, learn new things about the world and find new ways to use our time. I began using Netscape and AltaVista browsers long before Google.

AltaVista Search Engine ca. 1999

It was not until 2004 that Firefox was developed and then, in 2008 Google Chrome came out. (Google was founded in 1998, though the domain name Google.com was registered in September 1997).  Google impacts millions of lives every minute of the day in 2019!

Communications technology made advances as well.  Though pagers had been around for a number of years, the wide use of them didn’t really hit until the late 1980s.  One of my first jobs while in college at Arizona State was in a pager “call center.”  Customers would call in to the center and we would send out the messages to pagers.  At that time it seemed like a real communications break-through, though pager owners were all fairly well to do…mainly doctors, lawyers and company leaders.

A typical pager from the early 1990s

Along with pagers, the emergence of mobile phones as a consumer product started hitting in the early 1990s. I distinctly remember using a Motorola 3200 for the first time when I was working for a Real Estate Auction company in Phoenix.  The owner lent me his.  This was in 1992.  Back then it was a very expensive toy…but so cool to talk while driving a car.  Understandably, like Google, the cell phone revolutionized the world.  As for the direct impact on our family…. I believe our very first cell phone was purchased in 1997 or 1998.  It was a Motorola Flip Phone.  Reminded me of Star Trek!   That really helped in communicating with my wife at home.

The first mobile phone I ever used was a Motorola International 3200

The firs cell phone we ever owned was a Motorola Flip Phone

We had our own home computer to connect to AOL and the internet in 1995.  It was fun to add software to it.  Little could we imagine that 24 years later these would be such a part of our daily lives.  I have worked in the Internet-related industry for most of the 21st Century, and particularly since 2010.  The typical office worker uses one all day.

This is a sample Bernina shot. I don’t recall which kind Julianne had

Julianne worked at a Quilt Shop for a number of years in Lexington and became a Bernina Sewing Machine trainer. Bernina, like many other companies, had developed computer connectivity and thus took embroidery to a whole new level.  Julianne needed a computer at home just to run her machines.

Back to the phones…another breakthrough began around the turn of the 21st Century as cell phones became internet capable.  Everyone wanted one.  But the explosion didn’t really occur full scale until around 2007 when the iPhone was introduced on June 29, 2007.  Julianne and I have actually had iterations of these from the first one to our current iPhone X devices in 2019.  And boy how these have changed the world for all of us.  Can you imagine living life without a mobile device? I can’t!

First generation iPhone

The iPhones and Android devices of 2019 are so powerful that an entire life can be contained on them.  They have access to the internet.  They can take and store photos.  They become music players..no need for a separate MP3 device (oops, I even skipped over the MP3s and many more applications associated with computers),  You can do your banking.  You can send messages all around the world.  And then there are the selfies.

Julianne and I at the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota — a typical photo with our cell phone

Taking a selfie with cell phone in 2015. Top was my picture. Bottom was one of me taking it.  That is San Francisco in the background

So, in closing, here are a few more things that have happened just because of computers, the internet and cell phones:

  • The first website was created in 1990
  • NetMarket became the precursor to Amazon and EBay in 1994
  • EBay was founded in 1995 (originally as AuctionWeb)
  • Amazon.com started in 1995 and has revolutionized the world of retail
  • Wikipedia was started in early 2001
  • LinkedIn got its start in 2002
  • Facebook began in 2004
  • YouTube’s first video was posted on April 23, 2005
  • Twitter began in 2006
  • Instagram started in October 2010

WHEW!!  And that was just the technology of the Information Age Explosion.  Part 3 will look at other great changes.

Julianne’s iPhone has trouble understanding her many times.

 

Facebook is 10 and I have lots of Friends

FacebookFacebook turned 10 years old this week. In celebration, they provided a look back video for all Facebook users that wanted one. Here’s a link to mind if you’re interested in seeing it.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10152212236907090

The bigger story to me, is how Facebook has been a catalyst for the creation of new relationships. Anyone that uses Facebook knows that when you hook up with someone on Facebook you have “friended” them on Facebook. Currently I have 1468 friends on Facebook. I don’t say that to brag or to boast or for any other reason but to say that I have all of these “relationships”. It causes me to reflect on what the meaning of “friend” is now that we have Social Media.

FacebookLikeWhen I was in high school in the 1970s I moved three different times and went to three different high schools. I didn’t have an opportunity to make what I would call “long term” friendships. But, in each of my three high schools (Charles M Russell in Great Falls,  MT; Bozeeman Senior in Bozeman, MT; and Murray High in Murray, Utah), I was able to garner some good friendships. I was always an anti-clique friend to many, taking pride in the fact that I was able to cross numerous thresholds to become friends with members of the band, athletes and members of other groups and clubs in school. Nevertheless, each of my friends typically had something in common with me whether it was being a band member, or a cross-country team member, or a member of the journalism club, we always had something in common.

FriendsCurrently I really have very few relationships with individuals from my first two high schools in Great Falls and Bozeman, but I have a lot of good relationships with many from my Murray high school days. I’m not sure what the difference was since I spent the same amount of time at each school, but perhaps it was that I graduated from Murray High and that I joined the LDS (Mormon) church in Murray that many of my friends, most of whom were Mormons, probably deepened the relationships that I had. To this day some of them are still very close friends.

David and friends

David hanging with Brett and Scott in 1976

Back then our main means of communication was meeting and doing things together and talking on the phone. Very few of us wrote letters, and indeed, I was not a very good letter writer either. When I went to Japan to serve as a missionary for the LDS church, I did write a lot of letters and receive a lot of letters but most of them were from family members and not my friends. When I returned home in 1978, I once again hooked up with friends and we would go to movies, rock concerts and out to eat and other things that young twentysomethings did back then.

Writing Letters home in 1977

Writing Letters home in 1977

With the birth of America Online and appearance of email, the opportunity to hook up with friends via electronic communication became appealing to many of us. It was easier to start catching up with people and doing it via email. And, of course, in those days, we’re talking the 1990s, email was hip.

GotMailBut then about 10 years ago this new Internet thing called Facebook was born. It was the birth of social networking as we know it today. Initially it was college students and high school kids that caught on and started using Facebook. Adults like me, then in my 40s, just didn’t get it yet. But, responsible parents started checking in on their children’s Internet activities which included Facebook. We then wondered about ourselves participating in Facebook. At the same time, there were other groups trying to do the same thing. MySpace was born, and MySpace ended up being for musicians and it still is out there but nothing like Facebook. Others tried as well, but Facebook always seem to be the one to get the thumbs up from everyone.

MySpaceSo, on June 12, 2007 I joined Facebook (as you can see from my video).  I didn’t really begin posting much until around December of that year when my son Seth got married and I began using it as a photo news site.  Since that time I have posted 1000s of photos on Facebook, including 100s of “selfies” that I have taken from my road trips.  Many photos are with my friends.

Sumoflam with friend Antsy McClain

Sumoflam with friend Antsy McClain – 2013

More importantly though, Facebook has seemingly brought about a new definition of “friend.” A search on Google defines friend as “a person whom one knows and with whom one has a bond of mutual affection, typically exclusive of sexual or family relations.” My definition of friend is close “a person with a common interest and one with a mutual affectionate relationship.” By affectionate I am not referring to the Touchy Feely kind of affection, but rather a relationship where you see someone or do something with them quite often. But, ironically, for many, some Facebook “friends” may be actually be people we have never met in person. Can you really become a friend with someone you have never met? That is the real gist of this post.

NoStrangersWell, much like my days in high school where I had friends across different spectrums of groups and organizations, I believe that I have been able to do the same thing through social networking whether it be Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Google+ or other forms of social networking. Indeed, I have what I would call different layers of friends on Facebook and these other social networks.

FriendPyramidTo be sure, I have a plethora of “friends” from all walks of life….Mormons, Catholics, Jews, Gays, Atheists, Right Wing Tea Party activists and left-leaning politocos, athletes, musicians, artists, photographers, vegans, food junkies, videographers, sports writers, authors, publishers, movie producers, truck drivers, computer nerds.

GoodFriendsNot counting my family “friends” on Facebook, perhaps my first and biggest layer of friends are those individuals with whom I have day to day and/or week to week interpersonal relationships, whether they be through business, church, or other activities that I participate in at this point. These are people that I physically know, that I have seen, that I have shaken hands with or given a hug to.  They may be work associates or friends from booster clubs and other organizations. These are my “close friends.”  I can recall letting work associates that, in many respects, we were like family.  They may have scoffed, but, in reality, we have forged relationships that go deeper than the job.

A "selfie" with my former work colleague and continued friend Colin

A “selfie” with my former work colleague and continued Facebook friend Colin

Visiting with my friend Keith in Idaho.  We served an LDS mission together in Japan and are now Facebook friends nearly 40 years later

Visiting with my friend Keith in Idaho. We served an LDS mission together in Japan and are now Facebook friends nearly 40 years later

Visiting with my friend Froilan from Cebu, Philippines.  We worked together in from 2005-2007 and visited with each other in Lexington in 2013. We are still Facebook friends

Visiting with my friend Froilan from Cebu, Philippines. We worked together in from 2005-2007 and visited with each other in Lexington in 2013. We are still Facebook friends

The next layer is what I would call my “long lost friends.” Hereafter,  I may use first names of many of these individuals, and these will be their real first names. Let’s take Sue for instance. I first met Sue in person in 1973 in Bozeman, MT. She was with her family visiting from New Jersey for a large Airstream Rally. I hung around with Sue and her sister and her family for the few days that they were in town because I was doing a article about the Airstream rally for my high school paper. After they left, we did not have any communication per se. But in 1975, I joined the LDS (Mormon) church and a year later left for my mission to Japan. After I returned from my mission in 1978, I moved to Provo, UT and, on my first weekend in church in Provo, lo and behold, I ran into Sue. It was obviously a shock to her as well because, at the time I met her in Bozeman, I knew nothing about the Mormon church. But she and her family had told me a lot about it because they were very devout members. Needless to say, she had a profound impact on my life and she didn’t even know it. After many years of searching, I finally found her and contacted her via Facebook, in a private message. And we have since become Facebook “friends.” Like me, she has since been married, had children and even had grandchildren. Today we rarely, if at all, communicate, even through Facebook. But Facebook offered us both something that other friendship opportunities may not offer. We get to be a “fly on the wall” of our friends and keep up with them, even when they don’t know it. That is, the opportunity to “lurk” on someone else’s life via their Facebook page.

FlyOnWallLurkingNo the word lurk is an unusual word. In computerese it basically means “to read or observe an ongoing discussion without participating in it.” In the past it seems to have referred to something a little bit on the shady side, something that was a bit secretive. But for a site like Facebook many friends do their lurking via the now well known “News Feed.”

NewsfeedI have a lot of “friends” and not a lot of time to read all of their posts.  So, occasionally I “drop in” on them and see what is going on.  If I like a post or a photo I will add a thumbs up so that they know I had dropped in.  I see many of those as well from “lurkers’ to my Facebook page.

ThumbsUpBack to my friends….  Indeed, I have rekindled friendships from the past such as with Pat and Sam from Bozeman, Maggie and Penny from Salt Lake, John and JP from Cebu, Gerhard (from Germany but now lives in Singapore) and Mark (from Lexington but now in Singapore), friends from Japan, Puerto Rico, China, Ireland, Australia and more.  It is fun to keep up with all of them.

Social Media Friends

Social Media Friends

I then have that thick layer…general acquaintances…friends of my children, people I have met along the way like Samantha and Lindsey from Camp 31 BBQ in Paris, Ontario or Lori from the March Madness Marching Band in Lexington (after I shared dozens of photos from parades in Lexington) high school coaches I met through an employer, people that want to share a part of their lives.

AcquaintancesThen comes the most interesting layer of all…the “Social Media” friends.  These are people I have met online or have become acquainted with through other common friends or interests.  Some of them I eventually met, like my friend Mari, a struggling author in Lexington; Dan, a Lexington photographer; or Ione from California (another Trailer Park Troubadours fan whom I met on a Troubs’ cruise).  Others I have become good friends with and communicate with at least weekly, such as Ed in California (who came to me through Antsy McClain and has since discovered our myriad joint interests), Michael from Georgetown, TX (another Troubs fan) or Tui from Dallas who writes a travel blog about quirky places and is currently publishing a book or even Doug (from Somewhereville, USA) who runs the Roadside America website.  And there are dozens more that have “friended” me for one reason or another.

The World is Smaller

The World is Smaller

So, on the week of Facebook’s 10th birthday, we can thank Mark Zuckerburg and his friends for their ingenious way of making the world smaller and having (in general) a profoundly positive impact on the world.  I know that Facebook (and my other Social Media sites) have really provided me with a richer outlook on life and the world I live in.

And to thank you for being a friend I am going to use one of my favorite musicians from 40 years ago – Andrew Gold

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