Countdown 365: #327 – Gratitude for Veterans

(Editor’s Note: As I approach age 60, I am “Counting My Many Blessings” by doing a daily countdown from 365. These are in no particular order, but, as you will see in days following, there is a method to the madness.)

VFWDisplayShelbyToday is Veteran’s Day. It is a celebration to honor America’s veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good.  Many of us celebrate this holiday without truly knowing of its origins.  But one can most certainly count Veteran’s Day as a blessing in their lives when they understand the significance.

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

DSC_1578On May 13, 1938, a Congressional Act made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday—a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as “Armistice Day.” Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nation’s history; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting in its place the word “Veterans.” With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

Walter Cronkite in the late 1960s

Walter Cronkite in the late 1960s

I was never in the armed forces.  I was in that lucky period shortly after the Vietnam War wherein the draft was eliminated. I was one of those 1970s teens that had tired of the ravages of war as we witnessed them each night on the nightly news with  with Chet Huntley and David Brinkley (on NBC) and Walter Cronkite (on CBS). I grew up listening to the protest songs from Woodstock. I wanted nothing to do with the armed forces.

What I did not understand as a teenager in the 1970s was that these soldiers were fighting to keep the freedoms that I most certainly enjoyed in my comfortable homes in Colorado, Montana and Utah.

Vietnam War Memorial

Vietnam War Memorial

As a college student at Northern Arizona University, I really began to learn about the wars.  I had returned from a two year LDS Mission to Japan and had met people that had suffered the ravages of World War II in their country, many by the hands of US Soldiers and bombs. I took classes on geopolitics and became well-versed on the Indo-China crises and the Vietnam War. I wrote papers on them.  As a Political Science major during my Master’s Course work at Arizona State University in the mid 1980s I focused on terrorism and insurgency.  Indeed, I gained a much deeper understanding and appreciation of our troops and forces, even if I didn’t agree with all of the reasons we went to war.

In the 21st Century I have seen diverse wars around the world through television and social media.  I have learned of terrorist actions and so-called “freedom fighters” in a variety of locations. I have also learned of how our armed forces have become the protectors of many around the world, and not just the citizens of the United States.

Some of my family members who have served. Only Joe and Lou Kravetz are still living

Some of my family members who have served. Only Joe and Lou Kravetz are still living

For these I am grateful.  I have gained a much more heartfelt appreciation for all of those that served in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Indo-China and Vietnam Wars, the Gulf War and more.  Indeed, I personally know dozens and dozens of individuals who have served our country.  And, unlike my 1970s self, I am honored to know them and consider their efforts and energies as blessings in my life.

Sumoflam with former Navy SEAL Rob Roy in 2014

Sumoflam with former Navy SEAL Rob Roy in 2014

Earlier this year I had the great fortune to meet two American heroes…former Navy SEALS Rob Roy and John MacLaren. I have learned a great deal from them, not just about war, but how war experiences can shape a life for good or bad.  In these two instances, they have shaped it for good and use their unique experience to help others improve.  I am truly blessed to have become associated with these two outstanding veterans.

Sumoflam with former Navy SEAL John MacLaren

Sumoflam with former Navy SEAL John MacLaren

I have worked with numerous other veterans in recent years.  They are regular people whom you may never know served, unless you were filled in on their service. There are too many to name here. But, if you are reading this and are one of those who has served the country in the armed forces, I thank you.  You have blessed my life and the lives of millions of others by your service.

 

Countdown 365: #361- Growing Up in the Age of Technology

(Editor’s Note: As I approach age 60, I am “Counting My Many Blessings” by doing a daily countdown from 365. These are in no particular order, but, as you will see in days following, there is a method to the madness.)

Check out the 70s threads

Check out the 70s threads

I am a child of the late 50s, 60s and 70s (I know, its obvious right?).  I grew up in my youth with black and white TV (with three channels – ABC, NBC and CBS) and we needed “rabbit ears” on the TV or an antenna on the house for reception, 45 RPM records and players, telephones with dials on them (also called rotary phones), cars with roll down windows (not electric) and a bright headlamp switch on the floor, non-electric typewriters and Kodak Brownie cameras that used flashbulbs, to name a few of the things. We enjoyed listening to our Top 40 hits on wonderful new pocket sized transistor radios…AM only. There was no such thing as a Drive-thru restaurant.

 

Black and White TV

Black and White TV

Rabbit Ears antenna

Rabbit Ears antenna

Pocket Transistor Radio and earphone

Pocket Transistor Radio and earphone

Kodak Brownie

Kodak Brownie

An red rotary phone from the 1960's or 1970's.

A red rotary phone from the 1960s

A car window handle from the 1960s

A car window handle from the 1960s

Old Type Writer

Old Type Writer

45 RPM record player

45 RPM record player

Color TV Console

Color TV Console

 

Then life got exciting as I grew a bit older…technology was in action! We got a color TV Console with a STEREO record player. We got a station wagon with air conditioning and electric window openers! Kodak came out with Instamatic cameras – even little portable ones (which I actually used when I was on my LDS mission in Japan)!

 

A Ford Country Squire similar to the one we had (see the photo above with me in it)

A Ford Country Squire similar to the one we had (see the photo above with me in it)

Kodak Instamatic portable camera

Kodak Instamatic portable camera with 110mm film

Kodak Instamatic w/ 126mm film and a flashcube

Kodak Instamatic w/ 126mm film and a flashcube

Polaroid SX-70 Camera

Polaroid SX-70 Camera

With the late 1960s we saw the birth of the 8 track tape…no longer did we have to turn our records over. And we could listen to our music in the car instead of the radio. And the Polaroid SX-70 Camera was to die for! Instant high quality photos. Soon the 8 track was being replaced by cassette tapes that cold be plugged into portable units and eventually, by the early 1980s we could listen to them in stereo on a Sony Walkman.  We had wonderful FM radio stations that played full album sides in a luscious sound. And the IBM Selectric was the thing to write papers on instead of a pen and paper.

8 Track Tape version of Pink Floyd

8 Track Tape version of Pink Floyd’s “Animals

An 8 track player in Car

An 8 track player in Car

Folding 8 track player combo

Folding 8 track player combo

IBM Selectric

IBM Selectric

Computer Punch Card

Computer Punch Card

When I first registered for college computers were in use…by the schools.  We would fill out computer punch cards.  It was so cool to see technology in action.  My first two years of college saw the advent of a typewriter with memory and a built in eraser.  I could type and go back a few lines to erase if I needed to.

 

The good old floppy disk

The good old floppy disk

By the time I was in my 3rd year of college we had connectivity to the mainframe and could write our papers on a computer using Wordstar and storing them on a floppy disk. Color TVs were everywhere and rarely would we see a black and white TV.  And, I forgot to mention that we had video tapes to both watch movies or even record our own. Typewriters were still around but they too were fading away.  The 8 track tape was vintage but no longer available in stores.

When I began my Master’s program at Arizona State University in the mid-1980s we now had portable PCs to use.  Still no such thing as email.  I had a part time job with a Real Estate Auctioneer and he had a brand new cell phone that looked like and felt heavy as a brick. But I could call my wife while I was driving…so cool!  And I also worked at a call center for pagers.  People from all over the country would call in and leave messages that we would type in on pagers.

Taking a Selfie with iPhone in San Francisco in 2015

Taking a Selfie with iPhone in San Francisco in 2015

Back then I was really grateful for technology.  But, little did I know that almost everything would be on my iPhone…my 8 track player is now an music player (and can store hundreds of songs that can shuffle), my black and white TV is now a streaming device for my satellite TV at home, my typewriter is a voice activated writer with a name (Siri).  I don’t need floppies.  My device at 64 GB has more memory than the entire mainframe had when I was in college.  Don’t need a camera either.  I can now take real selfies, thank you. I now talk to my grandkids over the internet while looking at them. My mobile device also measures my steps, keeps my calendar, lets me look at the internet, takes my heart rate, keeps my phone directory and contact list.  And don’t get me started on social media like Facebook and Twitter and LinkedIn…and yes, I not only use them, but they are what I do to make a living!!  I don’t even need a printed boarding pass at the airport or card or cash at Starbucks…all done on my mobile device.

iPhone 6s Plus - will have one of these soon

iPhone 6s Plus

Needless to say, everything I need is on my device…my LDS Scriptures (and a gazillion other things), my photo albums, my credit cards, my email, my contact list, my to do list, my calendar, I can check the weather wherever I am, my phone can tell WHERE I am and even automatically “geotag” my photos, Twitter posts, Instagram photos, etc.

Speaking of social media, I didn’t mention that I first started using something called America Online in 1993…had my own email address. HA! Email!! (It was eventually sumoman@aol.com)  Then they came out with something called the internet…I could connect my computer via my phone and wait and maybe find something useful on the World Wide Web over AOL after hearing a man say “You’ve Got Mail” (which by the way was voiced by a guy named Elwood Edwards – see article)

A flat screen TV

A flat screen TV

Oh, and nowadays we have these wonderful flat screen color TVs with internet access, 100s of channels of programming.

Ultimately, I am grateful to have grown up through the age of technology.  I have seen men walk on the moon.  I have personally produced 100s of live broadcasts from football fields and gyms across the country over the internet.

And what does the current present hold in terms of technology?  Cars that back themselves up, driverless cars, remote control smart houses where devices can be turned on and off through a mobile device from 1000s of miles away.

It has been an amazing 59 years and I am so grateful to have lived through it all and seen so much.  I can’t even begin to imagine what more I may see in the next few years.  Will the iPhone Mobile Device (or the Samsung Android Device) become an antiquated thing of the past that my children will be saying “I can remember when?”

Over the next year I may focus on few of the technologies that have had profound impact on my life.  But, the massively overwhelming changes – (records –> 8 track –> cassette –> CD –> DVD –> MP3 player –> Mobile devices  for instance) have made life amazing.  And certainly worth counting my blessings.

minority_report

The Internet and Me on the 30th Birthday of the Mac

Apple Logo 1984

Apple Logo 1984

Today is the 30th birthday of the Mac computer.  When it first came out in 1984, I was a senior in college in  Flagstaff, AZ. Little did any of us truly understand where we would be 30 years later with computers, the internet and mobile devices.

Indeed, 1984 was NOT like George Orwell’s 1984.

As I write this today in 2014, the computers and the Internet have become major factors in my life and the life of millions of others in the world (but I am still using a PC at home….can’t afford a Mac….). But I can recall when it wasn’t always that way. Indeed, I can recall when there was no such thing as the Internet. There was no such thing as networked computers either.  Even before I knew much about it, there was already some discussion.  Here is a news video from 1981 (from wimp.com) about what would later become known as the World Wide Web….

My first real interaction with computers didn’t occur until1986 when I was working on my Masters Thesis at Arizona State University. I was connected to a large mainframe (which had less memory than my iPhone today) and wasusing a black screen with colored text and using a program called WordStar which was only attached through the network.  I had to save everything to the network.

WordStar Screen

WordStar Screen

In the midst of my work on it, the first portable computers started arriving at the school. I can remember when a Compaq portable computer arrived at our computer lab. iI was kind of bulky, but it was portable nonetheless. Back in those days, we had to use DOS commands to move around and do things. With the new Compaq computers, we were able to save our content on a floppy disk. It was one of those real floppy disks…they were big, about 7 inches, and floppy.

Compaq portable computer

Compaq portable computer ca 1985

A 7" Floppy Disk that we used to save data on the Compaqs and other machines

A 7″ Floppy Disk that we used to save data on the Compaqs and other machines

This certainly revolutionized how school papers were written, for we no longer needed to use a typewriter (such as the IBM Selectric shown below) with auto correct on it, I could use a computer and never have to print anything out until I was ready. Boy was that cool back then! (As a side note, I never dreamed at that time that I would eventually work at Lexmark in the 1990s, which was born out of the IBM Selectric group!!)

IBM Selectric II

IBM Selectric II

By 1987 I was on my way to Japan to work for the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program (JET Programme).  When I got there, they were still not using computers, but they did have a couple of “WaPro – short for WordProcessors” with convoluted keyboards. for all the Japanese characters. By the time I left in 1991, the “Internet” was available, but it was more like a bulletin board and I had to go to the local Nikkei Shinbun (Japanese version of Wall Street Journal) office in order to search anything. Looking back I can certainly see that it was a precursor to the Internet.

A Toshiba NWS-800 1987 "WaPro" as I saw them

A Toshiba NWS-800 1987 “WaPro” as I saw them

My first real experience with the Internet came when I got a membership to America Online (now known as AOL). (See AOL today) Yes, those people that were around in the 1990s probably remember seeing America Online floppy disks and CDs everywhere in every store and everywhere you went. (I wonder if anyone has kept one as a souvenir??) Seems like at that time everybody became an AOL member and they were able to send email back-and-forth to each other. We were starting to see online apps available and the Internet started to come of age.

AOL Logo circa 1990s

AOL Logo circa 1990s

AOL Floppy - 50 hours for free

AOL Floppy – 50 hours for free

AOL CD 100 Hours free

AOL CD 100 Hours free

Of course, we didn’t have high speed connections back then either.  We paid a high premium to the telephone company to get a 56K modem to hook to the telephone line.  When we were online, we couldn’t receive calls. Initially they were boxes we plugged in, but eventually you could get one added into a slot in the computer and then plugged the telephone line into it.

56K Modem Box

56K Modem Box

56K modem card for plugging into computer

56K modem card for plugging into computer

I can remember how cool it was looking up information on a browser through AOL. I even use the Internet for the first time in the 1990s to plan a trip when we had Barbara from France staying with us. Not everyplace was on the Internet at that time, but I was able to get maps and able to find some information about some places.

AOL Screen 1993

AOL Screen 1993

Windows developed Internet Explorer and a company named Netscape soon provided an alternative to the AOL browser. And search engines were born as well. Back then, before Google, there was AltaVista, which made searching for things on the youthful internet so much easier. I remember using it when I worked for Green Gates Farm as their office manager. Keeneland had just gotten their website up and running at that time. And we were able to look at the schedules and some of the other things. But Internet browsing was still a bit sketchy and things would go down.

AltaVista Search Engine ca. 1999

AltaVista Search Engine ca. 1999

By the late 1990s I was working as a contractor at Toyota and I experienced my first job working as a computer tech. I was originally hired to manage the printer configurations for Toyota’s Japanese printers, due in part to my work at Green Gates where I had to learn to configure our Lexmark printer to work with an HP Printer Driver (once again, at that time I had no idea that I would eventually end up at Lexmark!!). I soon started learning networking and at the same time the Internet started getting more and more capable. Internet Explorer had became the main browser as Windows grew. By this time AltaVista had been purchased by Yahoo!. Google wasn’t even really much of an entity at that time, though it had been created in 1998.

Despite all of this growth, it seems to me that the main use of the Internet at that time was still being able to email back-and-forth. AOL was still a big thing and everybody loved to hear that “you’ve got mail” whenever they would check their mail.

Since then, the Internet has blossomed.  It is everywhere.  We have mobile devices that access the internet.  I eventually worked at Lexmark, which was borne out of IBM.  I was basically working on the forefront of InkJet printer technology, which boomed in the 1990s but has since faded away.  Lexmark no longer manufactures inkjets and there are only a few companies that do.

Lexmark Inkjet - I actually oversaw the Software testing for this printer

Lexmark Inkjet – I actually oversaw the Software testing for this printer

Today Yahoo! still thrives, but is no longer the “big guy” out there.  That is now Google…indeed, the world seems to have become a GooglePlex….

YahooGoogleAnd of course, what of the 30 year old Mac? Apple is one of the biggest companies in the world and from the invention of iPods (for music) to mobile phones and now “mobile devices” such as an iPhone and an iPad, Apple too has come on its own.  I have a Dell laptop with Windows, but also have my own iPad and iPhone and can’t live without them….

Apple iPad

Apple iPad

Apple iPhone 5s with Internet Screens showing

Apple iPhone 5s with Internet Screens showing

We have come a long way in 30 years!!

David in 1984 at NAU Graduation

David in 1984 at NAU Graduation

David at Lexmark office after losing a bet on a high school football game

David at Lexmark office after losing a bet on a high school football game

David 2014 - Grandfather of nine and photo taken with mobile device and posted to the internet without a modem!

David 2014 – Grandfather of nine and photo taken with mobile device and posted to the internet without a modem!

Today, I work as a WordPress specialist and an internet Broadcast specialist.  I write three blogs.  I worked for a DotCom company (iHigh.com) for four years. I worked for a Printer Company.  I have done Network support. I have worked in a call center providing technical support for Mac users and iPhone users. Indeed, I eat, drink and sleep with the internet and derive 100% of my income from internet related work.  Its amazing what a History degree and Political Science Master’s degree will get you.  I never imagined I would be where I am today….but I am still a geek!!

Apple Logo 2014

Apple Logo 2014