The Selfie King – The Art of the Selfie

The Ultimate Selfie

The Ultimate Selfie – Alligator, Mississippi, June 2014

This is all about “The Art of the Selfie.” I have taken hundreds of them and love doing so.  In 2013 the Oxford Dictionaries announced their word of the year to be “selfie”, which they define as “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” As most of us know, the “selfie” has become a very popular form of sharing one’s activities, travels and a photograph with one’s friends, family and the world.  Though taking self-portraits has been around since the birth of photography (Robert Cornelius, a pioneer in photography, produced a daguerreotype of himself in 1839), since the mid 2000s, and especially since 2010, the genre has exploded, thanks to the proliferation of social media.

Clowning Around (Sumoelton)

Clowning Around (Sumoelton) – taken at home, Halloween 2012

I have always been one that wanted to have my picture taken wherever I went, more as a record, but in the past couple of years, with the new technologies that smart devices provide us, I’ve been very active in taking selfies without having to have other people interact with me. Honestly, with the posting of all these selfies, one might think that I am self absorbed. But that is not really the truth. I enjoy sharing the joy and excitement of the places that I have been and the activities that I have participated in.

Selfie with a HUGE potato at a drive-in theater in Driggs, Idaho

Selfie with a HUGE potato at a drive-in theater in Driggs, Idaho – March 2013

Even as a young boy I was always fascinated with being in front of the camera. Over the years I’ve had numerous “goofy” pictures taken of me and I’ve even taken a few “selfies” on my own. Here are a few “non-selfies” from years gone by.

My first "selfie" using a mirror.  I was at a barber shop in Japan when this bird landed on my shoulder.  I took it from an angle

My first “selfie” using a mirror. I was at a barber shop in Japan when this bird landed on my shoulder. I took it from an angle.  Taken in 1977 in Ogaki, Japan

I took this "selfie" in Jemez Springs, NM in Dec. 1978 - Turned the camera towards me and "point and shoot"

I took this “selfie” in Jemez Springs, NM in Dec. 1978 – Turned the camera towards me and “point and shoot”

Mirror image - used my cell phone to take a mirrored selfie at Colter Bay Village in Grand Teton National Park, March 2013

Mirror image – used my cell phone to take a mirrored selfie at Colter Bay Village in Grand Tetons National Park, March 2013

Kewpie Hair - took this after a nap with wet hair - taken in the mirror with my cell phone

Kewpie Hair – took this after a nap with wet hair – taken in the mirror with my cell phone – July 2014

Nowadays, it seems like I take them wherever I’m at, whether I’m traveling across the country or whether I’m with my grandchildren. Taking selfies is fun for me and fun for those around me (I hope).  But they also have become a great way of documenting trips and events.

Real Quiet Lane, Lexington, KY - October 2013

Real Quiet Lane, Lexington, KY -November 2013

In May and June I took two trips across the United States. The first trip was north to Michigan and across four states to Montana to see my daughter and her family. From there I returned south into Wyoming and across Wyoming, Nebraska, Illinois and Missouri to return home. On the second trip I drove south through Tennessee Mississippi and Texas and then back home through Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois.

Friendship, Arkansas - July 2014

Friendship, Arkansas – July 2014

On both of these trips I took close to 100 selfies each. Many of these were posted in Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr and some of my travel blog posts at lessbeatenpaths.com. As I moved across the states, friends and family were able to follow me (probably to the point of overkill). Of course, anyone that follows my adventures knows that I also like to ham it up in many of my selfies.  Always more fun.

Bison and Sumobison, Havre, Montana - May 2014

Bison and Sumobison, Havre, Montana – May 2014

In this post, I have no intention of posting all 150 or 200 of my selfies from those trips, but I am going to post a selection of them that I found fun and interesting. I will include the location and, if there is a back story, I’ll include a little of that as well. At the end of the post, I am also going to include a few of my other favorites from past trips.

Sumoflam with Hiawatha, the largest statue of a native American in the U.S. This was taken in Ironwood, MI in May 2014

Sumoflam with Hiawatha, the largest statue of a native American in the U.S. This was taken in Ironwood, MI in May 2014

I had the opportunity to visit my cousin Lew in Austin, TX in June 2014.  This is the famous Welcome to Austin mural

I had the opportunity to visit my cousin Lew in Austin, TX in June 2014. This is the famous Greetings from Austin mural

Big Fish Supper Club in Bena, Minnesota. Taken in May 2014

Big Fish Supper Club in Bena, Minnesota. Taken in May 2014

Pink Elephant in DeForest, Wisconsin - May 2014

Pink Elephant in DeForest, Wisconsin – May 2014

Not only do I find pink elephants with glasses, I can find big cows with PINK glasses - this was in Russellville, KY in June 2014

Not only do I find pink elephants with glasses, I can find big cows with PINK glasses – this was in Russellville, KY in June 2014

Bucksnort, Tennessee in June 2014

Bucksnort, Tennessee in June 2014

With Chief Washakie in Cody, Wyoming - May 2014

With Chief Washakie in Cody, Wyoming – May 2014

At Mammy's Cupboard Cafe in Natchez, Mississippi in June 2014.  Yes, I ate in that place too...unique looking place

At Mammy’s Cupboard Cafe in Natchez, Mississippi in June 2014. Yes, I ate in that place too…unique looking place

A star shining brightly at Carhenge in Alliance, Nebraska in May 2014

A star shining brightly at Carhenge in Alliance, Nebraska in May 2014

Sumoflam visits the Tee Pee Motel in Wharton, TX in June 2014

Sumoflam visits the Tee Pee Motel in Wharton, TX in June 2014

Personally, I think that the selfie has become a great form of “journal keeping.” These are things that will allow family and friends to look back and see what we have done. I think that too many people don’t document the things that they have done and then we lose that personal history.

At the corner of This Way and That Way in Lake Jackson, Texas - June 2014

At the corner of This Way and That Way in Lake Jackson, Texas – June 2014

Wyoming's Wildlife - yes, probably me...  taken at a rest area on US Highway 20 about 40 miles west of Casper, WY in May 2014

Wyoming’s Wildlife – yes, probably me… taken at a rest area on US Highway 20 about 40 miles west of Casper, WY in May 2014

Visiting Rock City near Valier, Montana in May 2014

Visiting Rock City near Valier, Montana in May 2014

I always endeavor to find unique places for selfies and just for a visit.  This was Endeavor, WI in May 2014

I always endeavor to find unique places for selfies and just for a visit. This was Endeavor, WI in May 2014

Sumoflamalope (a mix between a Sumoflam and a Jackalope.  Taken in Douglas, WY in May 2014

Sumoflamalope (a mix between a Sumoflam and a Jackalope. Taken in Douglas, WY in May 2014

Some gator teeth and me at P'maws Bait Shop in Pierre Part, Louisiana - June 2014

Some gator teeth and me at P’maws Bait Shop in Pierre Part, Louisiana – June 2014

With the old Paul Bunyan statue (built in 1937) in Bemidji, MN in May 2014

With the old Paul Bunyan statue (built in 1937) in Bemidji, MN in May 2014

Visiting the giant pyramid in Nekoma, ND in May 2014

Visiting the giant pyramid in Nekoma, ND in May 2014

With Sam Houston's head in Huntsville, Texas in June 2014

With Sam Houston’s head in Huntsville, Texas in June 2014

Naturally, when I travel, no matter when it is, I have my cameras on the ready.  In the past couple of years I try to also get photos with state signs and unique town signs. Here are a few from trips over the past couple of years.

Welcome to Winner, South Dakota.  Always great to be a Winner (and they had a major lottery winner in that town too!!) Taken in June 2013

Welcome to Winner, South Dakota. Always great to be a Winner (and they had a major lottery winner in that town too!!) Taken in June 2013

I meandered into Okay, Oklahoma in November 2012

I meandered into Okay, Oklahoma in November 2012

A visit to North Carolina in April 2013.  We actually took a trip to South Carolina and Georgia as well.

A visit to North Carolina in April 2013. We actually took a trip to South Carolina and Georgia as well.

Smile, you are in Pennsylvania...so I smiled in July 2013

Smile, you are in Pennsylvania…so I smiled in July 2013

Went through Nebraska on my to see Carhenge in May 2014

Went through Nebraska on my to see Carhenge in May 2014

Arriving in Texas on my way from Colorado and heading to Cadillac Ranch in Amarillo in June 2013

Arriving in Texas on my way from Colorado and heading to Cadillac Ranch in Amarillo in June 2013

Rudyard, Montana - and no, I am not the Old Sore Head...  May 2014

Rudyard, Montana – and no, I am not the Old Sore Head… May 2014

Welcome to Louisiana in June 2014

Welcome to Louisiana in June 2014

In Lost Springs, Wyoming (Population 4) in May 2014.

In Lost Springs, Wyoming (Population 4) in May 2014.

Had to visit the town of Cut and Shoot, Texas north of Conroe, just for a photo op with their City Hall and the town name - taken in June 2014

Had to visit the town of Cut and Shoot, Texas north of Conroe, just for a photo op with their City Hall and the town name – taken in June 2014

Naturally, I had to visit the birthplace of one of my favorite characters, Kermit the Frog, in Leland, Mississippi in June 2014

Naturally, I had to visit the birthplace of one of my favorite characters, Kermit the Frog, in Leland, Mississippi in June 2014

Route 61, the Blues Highway in Mississippi in May 2014

Route 61, the Blues Highway in Mississippi in June 2014

Heading to Carhenge in May 2014

Heading to Carhenge in May 2014

Welcome to Arkansas in June 2014

Welcome to Arkansas in June 2014

Then there are my ham it up, goofy and whimsical selfies that I love to take.  Here are a few from previous road trips and at home, around movie theaters, and other odds and ends for fun.

Bull headed at the Frontier Steak House in Dunkirk, Montana in March 2013

Bull headed at the Frontier Steak House in Dunkirk, Montana in March 2013

The Hodag and Sumoflam in Rhinelander, WI in August 2012

The Hodag and Sumoflam in Rhinelander, WI in August 2012

Home of the Hamburger - with the Charles Nagreen Statue in Seymour, Wisconsin, August 2012

Home of the Hamburger – with the Charles Nagreen Statue in Seymour, Wisconsin, August 2012

At the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Tennessee in June 2014

At the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Tennessee in June 2014

At the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Texas in June 2014

At the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Texas in June 2014

Being chomped by a Transformer Dinosaur at the movie theater in Lexington - July 2014

Being chomped by a Transformer Dinosaur at the movie theater in Lexington – July 2014

Escaping a T-Rex in Choteau, Montana in May 2014

Escaping a T-Rex in Choteau, Montana in May 2014

Within reach of the amazing metal dragon from Jurustic Park in Marshfield, WI in August 2012

Within reach of the amazing metal dragon from Jurustic Park in Marshfield, WI in August 2012

Being stomped by a giant dinosaur at the Indianapolis Children's Museum in September 2013

Being stomped by a giant dinosaur at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum in September 2013

Under a Fire-breathing Dragon in Vandalia, IL in September 2013

Under a Fire-breathing Dragon in Vandalia, IL in September 2013

Cuddling with a troll in Mt. Horeb, WI in August 2012

Cuddling with a troll in Mt. Horeb, WI in August 2012

Almost didn't see the stop sign covered in snow at the "Top of the World Store" in the Beartooth Range at 10,000 feet in May 2014

Almost didn’t see the stop sign covered in snow at the “Top of the World Store” in the Beartooth Range at 10,000 feet in May 2014

Suffering with Flamingo Pink Eye at the former Lynn's Paradise Cafe in Louisville in December 2012

Suffering with Flamingo Pink Eye at the former Lynn’s Paradise Cafe in Louisville in December 2012

Took a SumoGothic photo in Eldon, Iowa at the house used in the painting American Gothic in September 2013

Took a SumoGothic photo in Eldon, Iowa at the house used in the painting American Gothic in September 2013

Being corny at the Corn Palace in Mitchell, SD in April 2013

Being corny at the Corn Palace in Mitchell, SD in April 2013

Selfie with the Caddies of Cadillac Ranch in Amarillo, TX in June 2013

Selfie with the Caddies of Cadillac Ranch in Amarillo, TX in June 2013

Peek a Boo from behind an umbrella at Cave Run Lake in Kentucky in June 2013

Peek a Boo from behind an umbrella at Cave Run Lake in Kentucky in June 2013

Then there are my references to Antsy McClain…my good friend and favorite singer/songwriter….

Livin' the Dream - taken at a Hobby Lobby in December 2013 - refers to Antsy's CD of the same name

Livin’ the Dream – taken at a Hobby Lobby in December 2013 – refers to Antsy’s CD of the same name

Juxtaposed Antsy's Living the Dream CD with my face in July 2012

Juxtaposed Antsy’s Living the Dream CD with my face in July 2012

A "dualie" with Antsy McClain taken in 2013

An “usie” with Antsy McClain taken in 2013

Everything's a Dollar - in reference to an Antsy McClain song of the same name

Everything’s a Dollar – in reference to an Antsy McClain song of the same name

Enjoy the Ride - The Aluminum Rule from the Antsy McClain song "Living in Aluminum"

Enjoy the Ride – The Aluminum Rule from the Antsy McClain song “Living in Aluminum”

And just a few more goofball selfies to round out this post…

I get the point at Gronk's in Superior, Wisconsin in May 2014

I get the point at Gronk’s in Superior, Wisconsin in May 2014

Hanging with the Tin Family in North Dakota's Enchanted Highway in June 2013

Hanging with the Tin Family in North Dakota’s Enchanted Highway in June 2013

With a bottle of "Route Beer" at Rabbit Ranch in Staunton, IL in August 2013

With a bottle of “Route Beer” at Rabbit Ranch in Staunton, IL in August 2013

And how about some Ice Cream with that "Route Beer"... in Peoria, IL

And how about some Ice Cream with that “Route Beer”… at Twistee Treat in Peoria, IL

I always like to get a selfie at unusual places, like Stoner Drug in Hamburg, Iowa

I always like to get a selfie at unusual places, like Stoner Drug in Hamburg, Iowa

Or with famous things like the car used in American Pickers. This is in LeClaire, Iowa

Or with famous things like the car used in American Pickers. This is in LeClaire, Iowa

Took this at a place that had a bunch of totem poles made with chainsaws, in Wisconsin

Took this at a place that had a bunch of totem poles made with chainsaws, in Wisconsin

The Artsy side of me likes to get selfies where I "kind of" fit in....  This was in Council Bluffs, Iowa in August 2013

The Artsy side of me likes to get selfies where I “kind of” fit in…. This was in Council Bluffs, Iowa in August 2013

I recently read that there are now words being created for group “selfies,” with “usie” being one of the more common names, but other names are used as well.  here are a few “usie” pix I have gotten over the past couple of years….

David and Julianne at Corn Palace in South Dakota in 2012

The best “usies” are with my wife Julianne, this one at Corn Palace in South Dakota in 2012

An 'usie" with travel writer and blogger Tui Snider from Texas in June 2014

An “usie” with travel writer and blogger Tui Snider from Texas in June 2014

This "usie" is with Troy Landry, one of the stars of the History Channel's "Swamp People" series.  He hunts gators near Pierre Part, Louisiana.  I got this with him at his Dad's bait shop in Pierre Part in June 2014

This “usie” is with Troy Landry, one of the stars of the History Channel’s “Swamp People” series. He hunts gators near Pierre Part, Louisiana. I got this with him at his Dad’s bait shop in Pierre Part in June 2014

An "usie" with Danielle Colby from American Pickers taken in 2012

An “usie” with Danielle Colby from American Pickers taken in 2012

An "usie" with world renown guitarist Tommy Emmanuel

An “usie” with world renown guitarist Tommy Emmanuel

Naturally, as a grandfather of nine, I get a number of “usie” photos with my grandchildren.  My next “selfie” post will include quite a few of them, but, in closing, here are just a couple of my all time favorites to include in this first post.

With some of the grandkids in the car on the way to a movie

With some of the grandkids in the car on the way to a movie

Hamming it up with my East Coast grandson Rockwell

Hamming it up with my East Coast grandson Rockwell

A couple of the grandkids with Grandma and Grampz

A couple of the grandkids with Grandma and Grampz

Teaching my granddaughter Lyla to drive

Teaching my granddaughter Lyla to drive

Wnjoying time with my West Coast grandkids in Montana

Enjoying time with my West Coast grandkids in Montana

On that note I will end by noting that I am grateful for the wizardry of technology that allows us to do these “selfies” and “usies” and share them with the world. Photography has become fun and documenting one’s life has become more fun. Wizardry is fun…right Gandalf?

Sumoflam and Gandalf "usie"

Sumoflam and Gandalf “usie”

So, with that being said, I will probably have a couple more posts in the future of other selfies and most certainly of some family “usies.”

Check out my Travel Blog – Less Beaten Paths

If you subscribe to this blog, you will notice that I haven’t posted in a while.  That is because I have a complete Travel Blog now at http://lessbeatenpaths.com.  You can see many of my recent trips and there are links to older trips from my other blogs as well.

I will continue to post to this blog occasionally as I move it to a new theme.

Thanks for following!!

Cheers
Sumoflam

All photos and commentary expressed are copyright of Sumoflam Productions and David Kravetz. All rights reserved.

Three Days in Wisconsin – Day 2

Three Days in Wisconsin


(Finding Some Unusual
Things!!)

August 3-6, 2012


Day 2 – Jurustic Park, Chain Saw Totem
Forest, Hodag and a giant badger

by David “Sumoflam” Kravetz

 

Aug 5, 2012:
We were up bright and early in Wassau, WI, ready to pursue what promised to be
an exciting and fun day…but a really long one.  This day included my planned
highlight of the trip…a visit to the famed
Jurustic Park in Marshfield, WI. 
This place is a bit complicated to get to, but VERY well worth the drive. 
From Wassau, we headed west on State Highway 29, which we followed all the way
to State Highway 97 which we took all the way into Stratford. From there we went
west again on State Highway 153 until we got to County Rd E.  From there we
went South again.

 

Along the way, there is always plenty to
see…barns, farmland, strange places…here are a few of the scenes along the
way to Jurustic Park

 

An old bus in the trees, Killdeer Rd (must be some good roadkill!!),
a church steeple beyond the corn fields, and an old barn (I love old barns)

 


We continued south after crossing over County Rd C.  Soon
thereafter the road made a fairly sharp Left and then veered to the Right again. 
After crossing over a small river, we eventually came to Sugar Bush Lane on the
right.  This is a loop road, though we took the second entry to it. Either
one will get you there and you will definitely see the sculptures off to your
right.

 

Jurustic Park is the brainchild of former
attorney Clyde Wynia, who calls himself a paleontologist. In reality, he has
taken to doing metal work and welding of a hundreds of critters, which, he
claims (in his paleontologist hat), were many of the “extinct creatures that
inhabited the large McMillan Marsh near Marshfield during the Iron Age.” 
He claims to have discovered these creatures and has worked to get them back
together.  Wisconsin Public Television has a
wonderful
transcript
from an interview they did with him in April 2011…its a good
read.

 

 

Jurustic Park Welcome Sign…Sumoflam with “Paleontologist” Clyde
Wynia…learning about one of his many discoveries

 

Needless to say, I took well over 100
photos of the work there.  It was amazing…I will have a special edition
on my Less Beaten Paths
Blog
just about this place.  In the meantime, here are a few fun photos
of the place.

 

  

The Mailbox..you can’t miss it.  No smoking sign “The Butt
Stops Here”

 

L-R: An attorney, a Dragon and a Hobbit giving a thumbs up.

 

Two views of the centerpiece — a giant 18 foot tall dragon

“Designed as an Army Dragon, but now a Navel Dragon–see outie on
belly?”

 

“Down Payment on a Horse” and a befuddled frog

 

 

A guitar strumming frog and a “Petuna” Planter

 

  

Some toothy grins…

  

Attacking Fish

 

  

 

  

 

 

Tools of the trade

 

Clyde Wynia – Paleontologist founder of Jurustic Park



Jurustic Park, Marshfield, WI

While we were at Jurustic Park, there was a group of 50 somthings
that pulled up in their Corvettes, all parked in his very small parking lot. 
Was fun to see my classy car parked alongside all of the Vettes…

  

Mine is the car that is NOT a Corvette!!

After about an hour and half long visit being serenaded by Clyde
and his marvelous stories and antics, it was time to get back on the road again.
We again headed northwest towards Colby, WI.  Yes, THAT Colby, famous for
Colby cheddar.  We were all excited to get there and get some fresh cheese,
and hopefully, fresh squeaky cheese curds.  We did make it to Colby, but
alas, there are no longer any cheese factories there and you cannot get fresh
Colby cheddar in town (or so we were told….).  But the water tower makes
you think you’ll get some….

 

“Original” Home of Colby Cheese…none there any longer

 

After filling up with gas, we found some packaged cheese from a
factory 12 miles away.  That would have to do <sigh>.  We then
continued on our merry way north on State Highway 13 to our next unusual
destination near Medford, WI.  Once in Medford we had to get on Highway 64
and head west, which we took all the way to County High E.  From there we
made a right turn (North) and followed it all the way to County Highway M. 
We then made a left turn at County Highway M (West). 

 

I must note that along the way we saw some interesting things….

 

 
 


Fuzzy’s General Store and Bait Shop
, A
Bathtub road marker and an Amish Road Sign….

,

We continued past Mondeux Dr (on the left) and County E (on the right) and proceeded about another
mile.  The next sight was visible as could be on the left, just before
Forest Rd and the entrance to the Chequamegon National Forest.  So, what
were we looking for in this wooded area of Wisconsin?  Nothing other than
the forest of Chain Saw Totem Poles!!

 

  

The unique chainsaw mailbox sits at the entrance to Gordy Lekies
Chainsaw Totem Pole Forest

 

A guy by the name of “Chainsaw Gordy” Lekies created this unusual
piece of artwork and chainsaw collection as early as 2007. Gordy is a timber
harvester by trade in the Medford area.  He has over 400 chainsaws
collected and they are all now on display in poles on his property next to
Highway M.

 

 
 
 

Over 20 telephone polls are now displaying hundreds of old
chainsaws

 

 
 

There is still a pile of them waiting for a telephone pole
home…the guy on the right is some of Gordy’s chain saw art

 

We next proceeded back east on County Highway M towards the “Cranberry
Trail
” in hopes of seeing a real Cranberry Bog and maybe getting some
Cranberry goodies (Cranberry Cheese???).  We continued along Highway M
until we hit Forks Rd., turned left and headed north, which eventually got us to
the Cranberry Trail.  My disappointment was that there were no promotional
signs or anything, so we just drove up and down the road until we found what we
were looking for.

 

  

We did find the Cranberry Trail, some of which turns into a dirt
road, as shown above.

 

Finally found the

Copper River Cranberry Company
facility, along with a non-descript bog
behind it. 

No Cranberries and Copper River was closed (it was a Sunday mind
you)

 

Though the Cranberry Trail was a disappointment, we still had
plenty to do.  We proceeded towards our next main stop,

Rhinelander, WI
. Along the way up US 51, we found more novelties and even
found a Tomahawk…that’s the name of a town.

 

 
 
 

The
Butt Hutt BBQ, a Giant Moose at Road Lake Pub and Grill (though not nearly as
the big Moose
in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
),

 Tomahawk
(famous for the
Tomahawk Fall Ride
) and

The Wilderness Pole
sculpture in downtown Tomahawk.


This wood carving, standing in the middle of a boulevard, depicts
a northwoodsy scene involving bears, fish, eagles and a loon.

 

We
continued North on US 51 until we hit US 8 and then headed east toward
Rhinelander, also known as the “Heart of Hodag Country.”  What, pray tell,
is a Hodag? There is a great unique writeup

HERE
. According to the Rhinelander website,


the Hodag is a mysterious woodland creature that makes its home
in the Rhinelander Area.


Why the Hodag is only found in the Rhinelander Area is not
certain. However, many people believe that it is the clean lakes, dense forests
and incredible natural beauty that ties the Hodag to the Rhinelander Area. 
The photos below are of the Hodag statue in front of the Chamber of Commerce:

 

  

The
famous Hodag of Rhinelander, WI

 

From
Rhinelander we continued on US 8 towards Monico.  Along the way we found
more fun stuff…totally by happenstance:

 

 
 

Lo
and behold…a Graffiti Trailer, a HUGE painted Rock and

George
Lake

 

In
Monico we visited the “Rhinelapus
statue, which appears to be an attempt to play on the fame of the Hodag. It was
all fenced in and difficult to get a photo.  It is like a huge three-clawed
tree monster. In any case, it was not nearly as impressive to me as the Hodag.

 

From
Monico we headed south on US 45 as we worked on winding up our long eventful
day.  Soon we came upon the small burg of Birnamwood, WI.  There
really is not much there, but we did come across what appears to be the world’s
largest Badger Statue, ironically greets you at the Northern Exposure Strip
Club.  Forget the club…but don’t forget the badger.  You can read
the whole story on Roadside America
HERE
We also saw Chet & Emil’s with a large Chicken in town.

 



Giant Badger of Birnamwood…Chet & Emil’s Broaster Chicken

 


Perhaps our biggest surprise came as we approached Wittenberg, WI…a huge
expansive field of sunflowers in full bloom.  These were absolutely amazing
and, as the sun was heading down, the shadows were awesome.  I took about
50 photos.  Here are a few:

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

To be
honest, it is the wonderful surprises like these that make back road traveling
so much fun.  This sunflower field reminded me of a time in Ontario when I
came across an expansive tulip field near Woodstock (see
the photos on this page
)

 

 


More barns on the road towards Seymour, WI

 

Our
final stop of the day before heading into Green Bay for the evening, was in
Seymour, purported
home of the hamburger.

 

 

 



Statue of
Charles Nagreen
(1870-1951), who put ground beef patties in a bun and began
calling them Hamburgers back in 1885. 


Notice the Hamburger Planters!!  Click on his name or photo to read the
entire story.

 

After
learning about the beefy hamburger, we had one last surprise waiting for us on
the road to Green Bay.  Not cheese, not Packers…but Buffalo…  We
saw these buffalo on State Highway 54 heading east out of Seymour. Apparently
owned by Maass Farms,
these buffalo (or bison) are destined for the food chain.  But, they still
looked majestic, even in their pens.

 

 


Maass Farms Bison near Seymour, WI

 

It
was a long day and we finally made it into the Quality Inn in Green Bay…tired
yet fulfilled from a fun day of back road adventures.

 


Wisconsin Road
Trip – Day 1:Beef, Cheese, Mustard and a
Grumpy Troll

Wisconsin Road Trip – Day 3: Green Bay, Lambeau Field and Door
County Peninsula

 

Some roadside guidance provided by……

 

 See more of
Sumoflam’s Trip Journals

Visit Sumoflam’s “Less
Beaten Paths
” blog for more interesting places

sumoflam@sumoflam.biz


All photos and commentary expressed are copyright of Sumoflam Productions and David Kravetz. All rights reserved.

Three Days in Wisconsin (Finding Some Unusual Things!!)

Three Days in Wisconsin


(Finding Some Unusual
Things!!)

August 3-6, 2012


Day 1 – Beef, Cheese, Mustard and a
Grumpy Troll

by David “Sumoflam” Kravetz

 

Aug 3, 2012:
It was a rare occasion, an
opportunity to take a vacation.  My daughter Chelsea wanted a road
trip…she wanted her daughter Autumn to experience a “Grampz Style” road trip. 
So, on this long weekend in August, the three of us hopped in the Town Car and
embarked on a trip to Wisconsin. The goal of the trip was to hit some of south
central Wisconsin, see some “roadside attractions” and then drive to Green Bay
and up the Door County Peninsula and then back to Lexington. We drove on Friday
evening to cut off some of the long drive to Wisconsin, with an overnight stay
in Avon, Indiana. Following is the map of our trip.  Following is a map of
our trip from Lexington to Wisconsin and back.

 


General map of our 4 day trip – Lexington;
Avon, IN; Covington, IN; Champaign, IL; Middleton, WI;

Marshfield, Medford, Tomahawk,
Rhinelander, Seymour, Green Bay, Egg Harbor, Gibraltor and then to Hebron, IN

 

Aug 4, 2012:
A quick night’s rest in Avon and then on the road to Wisconsin.  Along the
way we made a few stops.  For fun, I was wearing a “Wear’s the Beef?”
t-shirt that Chelsea had given me from Wendy’s.  I had planned to do this
for a stop later in the day, but it worked out really well for our first stop,
which we just so happened to see off of the freeway, near Covington, IN. 
There is a place called the
Beef House Restaurant,
which is apparently famous for its yeast rolls.  We were way too early to
eat there, but I could not resist getting a photo with the sign!!

 

I think I found the beef!!

 


After the quick photo-op stop in Covington, we headed west towards the first
scheduled stop — to see the large Kraft Macaroni and Cheese Noodle statue in
Champaign, IL. Yes, this is a Wisconsin trip so we needed some cheesiness, and
we got it first in Illinois!!  Though a novelty roadside attraction for
someone like me, this is actually part of a
serious advertising
campaign
begun by Kraft Foods in 2010.  These 20 foot long, 9 foot tall
Noodle replicas have been placed in landmark areas such as

Fisherman’s Wharf
and

Wrigley Field
.  They also have one at their plant in Champaign, IL. 
Once we found the location, we noticed we could drive into the employee parking
lot  and walk right up to the noodle to get photos. Now that makes for a
Beefy Mac and Cheese (with my where’s the beef shirt!!). Here are a couple of
pix:

 

 

Kraft’s “You know you love it.” giant noodle statue. Map to this
location is below.



Kraft Factory in Champaign, IL


While in Champaign we decided to make a stop at the
Curtis Orchard. My
main reason was because of the huge Indian Statue (see below), but as we got
there, we found a number of other treasures.  The orchard has pretty much
turned the place into a Wizard of Oz themed attraction, including a Flying
Monkey Cafe!!  We stopped for photos, some apple cider and other goodies
and even followed the Yellow Brick Road!!

 

Chelsea and Autumn enjoy the Giant Rocking chair and find their way on the
Yellow Brick Road at Curtis Orchard in Champaign, IL

 

The Indian Archer, aka The Chief, was originally located in Danville, IL. 
The 17 foot tall copper statue was built

in 1949 for Herb Drew’s Plumbing and Heating.  When the business closed in
1994, the owner’s grandson

moved the Indian to the Curtis Orchard.  Apparently, the statue represents
Kesis, a famous Kickapoo Indian from Illinois.

The photo on the right is a large silo with a representation of the tin
man…appropriate.

 

  

This is painted on a barn door (notice the lock in the middle.  I am in the
picture to provide a size comparison.

 

Well, we have had the beef, the cheese and some fruit….time for some Mustard!! 
From Champaign, we headed north towards Wisconsin to get to the famous Mustard
Museum.  However, along the way, we ran into another unexpected
treat…another of the many Wind Farms that I have come across in my travels. 
This one is called the Twin
Groves Wind Farm
. The Wind Farm features over 240 turbines across 22,000
acres of land. It generates over 396 megawatts, enough to meet the energy needs
of about 120,000 homes. In my travels I have seen these in California, Kansas,
Ontario, Montana, Illinois, North Dakota and more.  They are always
fascinating.  I really love a couple of the shots I got of these because of
the mingling with the corn fields of Illinois.  Autumn and Chelsea were
stunned by the size of these towering wind turbines.

 

 
 

A few of the over 240 Turbines in the Twin Groves Wind Farm

 


Onward north up Interstate 39 out of Normal, IL towards Madison, WI, we made our
into Middleton, which is situated northwest of Madison on the Beltline. 
Originally built and housed in Mt. Horeb, WI (see
my original writeup on a visit there here
), the
National Mustard Museum
has moved to much bigger digs in Middleton.  There they now have a nice two
story facility with everything you ever wanted to learn about Mustard, but were
afraid to ask…or taste. According to the official Mustard Museum website,



t
he
National Mustard Museum began
 as
the “Mount Horeb Mustard Museum” when its founder & curator, Barry Levenson,
started collecting mustards on October 27, 1986. The story of the Mustard Museum
traces its roots to a late night visit to an all-night grocery when Barry heard
a deep, resonant voice as he passed the mustards:
 “If
you collect us, they will come.” 


Currently the National Mustard Museum houses over 5400 varieties of Mustard from
around the world as well as hundreds of pieces of Mustard Memorabilia. 
Also, the place offers degrees from Poupon U.  I now have three degrees
from there (snicker).  Ironically, we so happened to arrive on National
Mustard Day!!  What a kick!

 


National Mustard Museum — Founder Barry
Levenson on the left along with his fancy glitter headed employee.

 


 

Barry’s mustard inspired art work “The
First 27 Virtues of Mustard”.  Barry studied under Professor Elbert
Culpepper at the new

museum of Crappy Art in Flushinghard, VA.

 


 

Got Mustard?

 


  

A couple of the 1000s of varieties
available for sale.

 


 

I think this is the only Mustard Vending
Machine anywhere…and, if you like bacon, you can also get your fix a the NMM.

 


  

Mustard displays aplenty…the one on the
left is to show the variety of containers available.

On the right are varieties produced in
every state in the US.

 


  

Welcome to Poupon U…you can actually get
a diploma while there. The diploma above is the MBA degree.

 


  

There is an official “Poupon U
dumping station” — I made a donation!!

The restrooms feature “Plochman’s
Mustard Bottle” Soap Dispensers

 

After being mustarded away, we were back
on the road meandering our way towards
Mt. Horeb
Chelsea was excited about Mt. Horeb due to its famed troll statues. 
Indeed, the main attraction for the town are the trolls. The town has created a
Trollway
along Highway 151 with many large carved wooden trolls visible from the road.
Many of these were created by local artist
Michael Feeney. We
found a few on our visit…. 

Click here for a nice map
of the town, with all of the trolls and other
attractions.

 

 

Welcome sign.  This scrap metal dragon on the right was
created by Wally Keller, a nearby resident. 

I visited his menagerie a number of years ago near Vermont, WI. 
See my link at


http://www.sumoflam.biz/WashJournal.htm

 

  

Open House Imports is full of troll goodies…Moonhill Mercantile
has a cool looking sign

 

These three trolls reside at Open House Imports

 

Some of the trolls of Mt. Horeb – A small troll from the shop; a
new one in town; “Sweet Swill”; another nameless one

 



Two views of the “Peddler Troll”

 

We finished off our visit and pretty much our day by grabbing
some grub at the “Grumpy
Troll
“, a local pub, brewery and dining establishment.

 

‘Nuff said…and shown!!

 

Wisconsin Road Trip – Day 2: Jurustic Park, Chain Saw Totem
Forest, Hodag and a giant badger

Wisconsin Road Trip – Day 3: Green Bay, Lambeau Field and Door
County Peninsula

 

Some roadside guidance provided by……

 

 See more of
Sumoflam’s Trip Journals

Visit Sumoflam’s “Less
Beaten Paths
” blog for more interesting places

sumoflam@sumoflam.biz


All photos and commentary expressed are copyright of Sumoflam Productions and David Kravetz. All rights reserved.

Seeking out the Bugtussles of America: A Road Trip from Lexington, KY to Texas


Lexington to DFW – Part 1


(thru Bugtussle, KY and Bugtussle, TX)

Feb. 21, 2010


Seeking out the Bugtussles of America!!

by David “Sumoflam” Kravetz

 

Feb 21, 2010: Yet
another opportunity for a ROAD
TRIP courtesy of

iHigh.com
!! 
We needed to get some schools active in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area and so I asked
to take a trip to Dallas.  Due to costs, I offered to use the weekend to
drive and would stay at my Sister Sherry’s house in Keller, TX while there for
the week.  This is Part 1 of my Texas trip – my search for Bugtussle USA.


Lexington, KY thru Flippin, KY, Bugtussle, KY, Bucksnort, TN, Only, TN thru
Bugtussle, TX into Keller, TX – all in one day

 

I left the house at 4:30 AM to head south on what would be one long day of
driving and seeing some interesting places along the less beaten paths of
America.  My main goal for this beautiful Saturday morning was to get to
Bugtussle, KY and eventually all the way to Bugtussle, TX and perhaps be the
first person ever to document such a trip!!  And I did it.  Here is
the story….

 

I drove west along the Bluegrass parkway to I-65 near Elizabethtown and then
headed south until I got to Kentucky 9008 (Cumberland Parkway), north of Bowling
Green.  I headed down the highway just into Glasgow and then left the
freeway to go along less beaten paths. from Glasgow I took KY 249 due south
through beautiful farmland and was greeted by a fabulous sunrise just north of
Lamb, KY.

 


 
 

The sun rises above pastoral lands near Lamb, KY

 

As the sun rose, I was also greeted by a call from my sweetheart Julianne, who
wanted to make sure I was doing OK since I had awaken so early in the morning. 
I was fine but lamented to her that I still had not seen “Herry”, my term for
blue herons.  I figured along those roads with all the ponds, that I would
see one.  Ironically, shortly after hanging up, I came down a hill and in a
small pond on my left was Herry.  I stopped to snap some shots of him, but
he flew off…so this is all I was able to get.  I also saw some deer just
across the road. There were 5 head of them.

 


 

“Herry” the Blue
Heron – my favorite bird – greets me early in the morning

 


 

Deer scamper in the fields along the road just north of Flippin, KY

 

As the sun rose, I came into the small village of Flippin, KY.  This is an
unusual name, but it is actually not the first Flippin I had come across. 
Through my work at iHigh.com, I had done some support work with a school in
North Central Arkansas,

Flippin High School
and had found the name to be unusual.  I asked the
school people about it and they said there are lots of people in the area named
Flippin.  According to


one history
of Flippin, AR
, Thomas J. Flippin and his family left Kentucky for the
Ozarks in 1820 and settled in what is now the Marion County area of Arkansas.
Perhaps the Arkansas Flippins were the original settlers in Flippin, KY.  I
am not really sure though,  But it makes an interesting town name in this
day and age when the word flippin’ is used as a sort of expletive.

 

Well, with that in mind, I was soon driving through Flippin, KY, with a
population of a few dozen people or so. My first sight of the village was of
this great cabin and wood pile:

 


 


 

Then there was the
Flippin “Post Office”?? and the Flippin Volunteer Fire Dept….

 


….but nothing
topped the Flippin Church of Christ

 

From Flippin, I
continued south on KY 100 towards the small town of Gamaliel, KY.  This
name reminded me of a name out of Tolkien’s “Lord of the Rings”, but
actually, the town name is derived from the Bible.  Gamaliel was supposedly
the teacher of Paul the Apostle. (See Acts 5:34).  Once in Gamaliel, I
turned right on Main St. headed west on KY 87, a windy little road that
eventually brought me to Bugtussle, KY…or what is left of it anyway. At one
time Bugtussle appears to have had a small store.  The store practically
backs right up to the Tennessee State line.

 

So, why the interest
in Bugtussle you ask?  This name for me goes way back into the late 1960s. 
When I was around 11 or 12, I was a big fan of the television show, the


Beverly Hillbillies
, a show about a hillbilly family that moved to Beverly
Hills after becoming millionaires due to an oil strike on their homestead. 
Jed Clampett (played by


Buddy Ebsen
),
the patriarch, was from a fictitious town called Bug Tussle. In 1967 there was
even an episode titled “
The
Mayor of Bug Tussle
“, wherein Mayor Amos Wentworth Hogg traveled from Bug
Tussle to Beverly Hills to visit his friends the Clampetts.  Actor


James
Westerfield
played Mayor Hogg. During the late ’60s and early ’70s, a couple
of other “sister shows” seemed to add to the fray.  There was “
Petticoat
Junction
“, which was set in the fictitious town of “Hooterville” (which is
later where the show “Green Acres” was set — kind of a reverse of the
Hillbillies in that rich big city folk moved to the country.)  If I recall,
Bug Tussle had even been mentioned in an episode of Petticoat Junction. 
All that being said, since those days I have always remembered Bug Tussle and
Hooterville.  Then, last summer, as I was perusing the map for odd-named
towns in Kentucky, I came across Bugtussle.  I just HAD to find my way
there….and I did.

 


 
 


Shows from the
’60s…Jed Clampett (center), supposedly was from Bug Tussle

 


 

Map and satellite
views of Bugtussle, KY.  The circled are on the map at right is the
Bugtussle store shown below

 


The road sign says
it all, but there was, at one time, a Bugtussle General Store at 6061 Bugtussle
Rd.

 

It was so exciting
to me to finally make it to


Bugtussle
.  But the more interesting part of this story is that, in my
research on Bugtussle, I found out that there are actually four of them in the
US.  One in Kentucky, one in Alabama, one in Oklahoma AND….one in Texas!! 
So, I set my sights on knocking out TWO Bugtussles in one day…and that was the
goal for this day (I know I said this above, but now you know the rest of the
story…)

 

So, what about that
name Bugtussle?  Apparently, Bugtussle was named by local comedians due to
its

doodlebug
population.  In an article in Time magazine (online
edition
), they write that “nobody knows how the town of Bug Tussle, Alabama
got its name. Its 300 citizens, mostly cotton farmers, rather think it refers to
their annual battle with boll weevils.”  I even found a

Bug Tussle Records!!

 

Well, enough about
Bugtussle for now…on with the trip.  Just 30 seconds south of the
Bugtussle General store is the “Welcome to Tennessee” sign and the highway
turned to TN 261. Still out in the boonies, I headed south through Enon, near
Pumkintown and then past Frog Pond, where there is a BBQ stand.  Makes me
wonder what is barbecued here….ironically, I passed a Flippin Rd. just before
I got to the intersection of where Frog Pond Cemetery Rd. meets TN State Highway
261.

 


 

 

Not too far from
Lafayette, on TN 52 towards Westmoreland, was Peggy’s Market which offered Home
Cookin’, Hardware and Feed.  I stopped for a gas stop and snapped the pizza
man below.

 


This Pizza Man was
out front

 

I finally made my
way into Nashville…but was just driving through.  I would hit Interstate
40 out of Nashville heading towards Memphis.

 


The Nashville
Skyline heading south on I-65

 

Along I-40 west out
of Nashville one can find some interesting towns right off of the freeway. 
I figured I would take a quick exit for a look-see….first stop-Bucksnort, TN,
easily accessed at Exit 152, about 40 miles west of Nashville. There is not much
there, but I did come across “Yesterdaze Pinball”, a sort of Pinball Machine
Museum.  There is also a song named after the town: “
Bucksnort,
Tennessee
” by a group called


Trailer Trash
Tremblers
, from the Netherlands.  Yes, a southern trash country rock
party group from the Netherlands with other songs such as Getaway Car, Beer &
Burgers and Gringo.  I think I will stick with the

Trailer Park Troubadours.

Wo knows for sure
how Bucksnort got it name, but legend has it that there was a trader named Buck
who lived in the area, and locals would say they were going to “Buck’s to get a
snort.” We may never know…

 


 

Welcome to the
booming town of Bucksnort, TN, home to

Yesterdaze Pinball

 

Well, it was back on
the freeway to head west, but off again at the next exit, 148, and then south on
County Hwy 920.  I didn’t have to go too far for my destination….Only,
Tennessee.  Yes…a town named Only.  Once again, it is barely a dot
on a map, but there is a road AND even a church…

 


 

Only is that a
way….on Only Rd….

 


 

This was the
funniest…I first saw the sign on the right and then got into town and saw the
real “Only Baptist Church”

 

After 5 minutes I
was back on I-40 heading west to the next exit, number 143, wherein is Buffalo,
Tennessee.  Apparently this is where country singer Loretta Lynn moved
after becoming famous.  She was originally from Butcher Holler, KY. 
Up the road about 7 miles is the Loretta Lynn Dude Ranch, her mansion, etc.

 


 

The buffalo statue
is in front of Loretta Lynn’s Kitchen in Buffalo…and yet another church…do
they worship Buffalo?

 

After these three
stops, I got back on the road and continued west.  Got into Memphis and
then crossed over the Mississippi River into Arkansas and then continued west
into Texarkana.  I had been there before and even had visited the


two state post office
.  This time I just stayed on the road and got to
the rest area just into Texas. This water tower is in two states…

 


 

Crossing the
Mississippi River into Arkansas; A water tower in two states – Arkansas to the
left, Texas to the right

 

By now I had been on
the road traveling for over 13 hours and the sun was starting to go down. 
As I approached Hooks, TX, the sun was setting and it was beautiful. 
I pulled off the freeway to get some shots.  I am thrilled with what I
got!!

 


 

Sunset just
outside of Hooks, TX…a beautiful balance from the sunrise earlier that day

 

Once photos were
taken, I then continued on I-30 west out of Hooks until I got to Exit 199, just
west of New Boston.  From there I hopped on US 82 and headed west through
Malta, Clarksville, Detroit, New Chicago, Reno and into Paris, a virtual world
tour!!  After a stop for gas in Paris, I continued west to Honey Grove, TX.
It was really dark out, but I was getting close to my destination…oh so very
close to my goal.

 

After driving
through Honey Grove, I headed south on County Rd. 34, only a few miles north of
what should be Bug Tussle, TX.  When I got to the intersection of County
Rd. 34 and FM 1550 (Farm to Market Rd.) I looked for some evidence of Bug
Tussle.  I knew from other photos I had seen that there was a house on the
corner with a sign that said Bug Tussle, TX –>.  I found the house in the
pitch dark, looked up where the sign should be, but, alas, it was no longer there….so
no evidence.  I was dumbfounded!!  All this way and all I could do was
photograph the two road signs.

 


 

The road signs at
the intersection where Bug Tussle should be (see maps below)

 


 

Here are the maps
with the intersection….

 

So, dejected at not
having found my second Bugtussle, I continued south towards Ladonia…then,
about 200 yards from the intersection, on my right, there it was…a little farm
road heading to a farm house.  And, at the entrance, a road sign, with the
name Bugtussle!!  Dejection had turned to overwhelming delight.  I had
driven from Bugtussle, KY to Bugtussle, TX in one day!!  And I had proof!!

 


Bugtussle and
Milton, 200 yds south of County 34 and FM 1550

 

Dead tired, I still
had a couple of hours to go to get to Keller, north of Ft. Worth.  I drove
through the ghostly town of Ladonia (see photos below) and then through Commerce and on
to I-30 again.  I followed I-30 into Dallas and then eventually made my way
to Keller, arriving at about 10:30 PM, Central Time…about a 19 hour drive from
Lexington.

 


 

Ladonia, TX:
Seemed like a ghost town in the dark

 

Stay tuned for Part
2: A Week in Texas and Part 3: An Uncertain (TX) trip home in search of Waldo.

 

All photos and commentary expressed are copyright of Sumoflam Productions and David Kravetz. All rights reserved.

More Adventures in SW Ontario: Baseball, Crokinole, Swans and Stuff

More adventures in SW Ontario
Baseball, Crokinole, Swans and stuff

Beachville-Embro-Tavistock-Shakespeare-Stratford-St. Marys
by David “Sumoflam” Kravetz

June 7, 2008: Today would turn out to be an interesting day with loads of variety.  I headed out around 8:30 after sleeping in.  I then headed west on county road 9 towards the small village of Beachville, Ontario, which is between Woodstock and Ingersoll. Beachville is where the first recorded game of baseball was played, at least in Canada, if not in N. America.  I also made a visit to the World Crokinole Championships.  If you have not heard of Crokinole, you’ll know what it is after reading this.  After that I made a venture into Perth County, visiting Shakespeare, Stratford and St. Marys. Some beautiful spots.  After this day of events, I returned to the hotel, showered and then headed to Bright, Ontario to see the Walters Family Dinner Show.  I have done a separate page on that visit.

Beachville: This is a small town just west of Woodstock founded in 1791.  The town was NOT named because of a nearby beach.  Rather, it was named after Andrew Beach, who was the postmaster. The town also claims to have had the first post office and grist mill in Canada. I am not sure how many people live here, but there aren’t many.  But, the town does have its claim to fame being noted for the first game of baseball ever played on June 4, 1838, one year before the game in Cooperstown took place. This game was played by the Beachville Club and the Zorras.  This event is now commemorated at the Beachville District Museum.


According to the history, a group of men gathered in a Beachville pasture on June 4, 1838 to enjoy a friendly game of baseball and had little idea that they were making history. Their match was the first recorded baseball game in North America. Beachville’s claim is based upon a letter to “Sporting Life” magazine by Dr. Adam E. Ford detailing the rules and recalling the names of the various players. On April 26, 1886, Dr. Ford, a physician who had grown up in Beachville and emigrated to Denver, Colorado, wrote the letter describing the June 4, 1838 match. Ford’s letter confirmed that the game had a long history in his community since: “certain rules for the game” were insisted upon by two of the older “gray
haired” players, “for it was the way they used to play when they were boys.” The importance of Ford’s letter lies in the fact that it provides the first formally recorded account of baseball as a formal game.  In this letter, the game was described as having five bases or “byes,” base lines twenty-one yards in length and the distance from the pitcher to the home bye was fifteen yards. Innings determined the length of the game as opposed to playing to a specific number of runs. Fairly and unfairly pitched balls were described and techniques mentioned for the pitcher to make it difficult for the “knocker” to hit the ball. The differences between “fair and” “no-hit” balls were described and each side was given three outs per inning. Base running became even more exhilarating because you did not have to follow a straight path to the next bye, (or base). If in danger of being plugged you could take off into the outfield, and while fielders then had the chance to “plug” you, other runners could advance.

Field Breakdown for the First Game

The two teams playing that day were the Beachville Club and the Zorras. The Zorras hailed from the north townships of Zorra and Oxford. The site selected for the game was the field just behind Enoch Burdick’s shops, (today near Beachville’s Baptist Church.)  The ball was a ball of double twisted woolen yarn, “covered with good, honest calfskin.” It was sewn by Edward McNames, the local shoemaker. And, according to Dr. Ford, “the club was generally made of the best cedar, blocked out with an axe and finished on a shaving horse with a draw knife. A wagon spoke or any nice straight stick would do.”

One of the Original Jerseys from the first game

Replica of Original baseball used

An old catcher’s mask, ball glove and chest protector from the
olden days of baseball

The reason for my visit today was that the museum was celebrating the 170th anniversary of the first game by setting up a field and different age groups of teams would compete.  Winning teams would get a trophy and each participant would get a commemorative patch.

L-A commemorative jersey from the 150th celebration.
Commemorative patch went to all participants.

I did not stay for the game, but I did look around the small, but unique museum. There are a few other baseball artifacts and there are a number of other old farm implements and other things.

An old sled, some old pulleys and the original Beachville jail
are on one of the barns

Old farm tools, gauges and yokes


An old National Truck that was converted to a bus

The museum building, first built in 1851

An old game board

There are lots of old farm and business implements on the site

Embro: I left Beachville shortly before the games had begun and was on my way to Tavistock, Along the way I went through the town of Embro, which is famous in Ontario for their Highland games, which take place in July. The town is yet another small town, but has a rich heritage.  I loved the sign in front of town and the big Tug-of-War.

An old hardware store, the unique Embro sign and a nice church

The town of Embro is also famous for renowned missionary the Reverend George Leslie Mackay, who founded the first Canadian overseas mission in Tamsui, Taiwan in 1872.  He was the first Canadian missionary to venture to China. In 1881, Mackay inspired the people of Oxford County to launch an ecumenical drive throughout Oxford County that raised over $6,000 to help establish Oxford College, now part of Aletheia University in Tamsui. He also
founded many schools and the Mackay Memorial Hospital in Taipei.  Oxford County and Tamsui, Taiwan have become twinned and have a number of exchange activities as a result of the McKay connection.

Bust of G.L. McKay located in downtown Woodstock

This was done by Sculptor Neil Cox from Toronto

I next headed to Tavistock (East Zorra-Tavistock), which is, coincidentally, the home of the Zorras that played the first baseball game.  Tavistock is a small agricultural community and sits on the northern border of Oxford County and is just a few miles south of the small town of Shakespeare, Ontario in Perth County.  The entire township (including Innerkip, Hickson and some rural areas) has a population of little over 7000. Their largest industry is cheese manufacturing. I arrived in town and saw that the entire town was having a yard sale, similar to how neighborhoods in Lexington do it.  I thought this was a unique idea and most definitely a good exercise in community building. (Mayor McKay told me that this is done in conjunction with the Crokinole tournament to provide the members of the community to do something during this event that draws folks from all over Canada and the United States.)

Vital residents of Tavistock (other than the people)

Cheese is a large industry in this township

I was invited to the 10th Annual World Crokinole Championships by Tavistock Mayor Don McKay, one of the officials at this year’s event.  I was greeted by Mayor McKay and also met Tavistock Gazette Editor Bill Gladding.  Both were gracious enough to introduce me to this game.  The championships are held in this small town as this is where the game was apparently invented in the 1870s.


Tavistock Arena, home of the World Crokinole Championships

Historically, the game of Crokinole got its start near Tavistock. According to the Crokinole
website
, “the earliest known Crokinole board (with legitimate, dated provenance) was made in 1876 (not 1875 as previously reported) in Perth County, Ontario, Canada.  Several other home-made boards of southwestern Ontario origin, and dating from the 1870s, have been discovered within the past 10 years, suggesting confirmation of this locale as the probable ‘cradle’ of Crokinole birth.  Earlier Canadian written sources detail the game from the mid-1860’s.  Several years after that time, a registered American patent suggests 1880 as the time when commercial fabrication began – first in New York, then Pennsylvania.  The games that no doubt contributed to the arrival of Crokinole seem to be the 16th century British games of shovelboard-from which modern-day shuffleboard descends, the 17th century pub game shove ha’penny, and the Victorian parlor game of squails that appeared in England during the second quarter of the 19th century.  In addition, Burmese or East Indian carrom (developed during the 1820s) seems a logical ancestor of Crokinole due alone to the very similar shooting or fillip technique involved.  And while a German game known as ‘knipps-brat’ (various spellings in high and low Germanic dialect exist) may have had similar features, game historians agree the aforementioned British and Asian predecessors seem the most likely links to modern-day
Crokinole.”  The design of the board is credited to craftsman, Eckhardt Wettlaufer ca. 1876.


Oldest known Crokinole board on left (made in 1876) and modern day competition-use board on right.

Crokinole (pronounced croak-i-knoll) is an action board game with elements of shuffleboard and curling reduced to table-top size. Players take turns shooting discs across the circular playing surface, trying to have their discs land in the higher-scoring regions of the board, while also attempting to knock away opposing discs.


Crokinole objectives and a full board used in the tournaments

I am not going into detail about the rules as they can be seen here. But the object of the game is to knock your opponent’s disc into the ditch or into a lower scoring position.  Players flick (or shoot) the discs with their fingers and try to hit the opponent’s discs to gain the most points.  Points are scored as shown in the above diagram.  There is also a variety where the players can use cues.  For the world tournament, the games are timed.



Flicking the disc or using a cue, either way, you want to knock
the opponent’s disc out

The Tavistock and District Recreation Centre was near capacity with a registration
of 548 people playing throughout the day.  There were not only folks from all over Canada, but there were representatives from seven US states (including Colorado and California) and even participants from Scotland and Australia. The joy of this game is that young and old can play together.  This was evident in that there were 6 year old participants and even an 87 year old. For a full detailed article about the tournament this year, please visit Bill
Gladding’s (from the Tavistock Gazette) news article. Read carefully…I was pleasantly surprised to see that Bill mentioned me and my site as well.

Over 500 participants from around the world participated

Brian Cook, from Owen Sound, ON,  was this year’s champion
(as well as last year’s)

(photo courtesy of Bill Gladding, Tavistock Gazette)

A couple final notes about Crokinole.  The interest in this game has increased in recent years.  In 2006 there was a documentary movie made on the game. The world premiere occurred at the Princess Cinema in Waterloo, Ontario in early 2006. The movie follows some of the competitors of the 2004 World Crokinole Championship as they prepare for the event. It also features interviews with Wayne Kelly (Mr. Crokinole) and Crokinole board maker Willard Martin.  Also, Joe Fulop, who was awarded a lifetime achievement award and of whom the Toronto Press coined as the “Wayne Gretsky of Crokinole“, has written a new book called “It’s Only Crokinole: But I Like It”, an 83 page book about the game.  This year’s champion, Brian Cook wrote a section and, ironically, the person for whom I worked for 5 months as a contract Japanese interpreter at Toyota in Woodstock, Derek Kidnie, also wrote a section.  Turns out that Derek is an avid Crokinole enthusiast and I never knew!!  Strange how this world throws fun things at you! By the way, Mr. Fulop’s book is available for $18 (or $27 for a color edition) by calling him at 519-235-1022 or by email at
jfulop@cabletv.on.ca.

 

Crokinole: The Movie  & Joe Fulop (on left)
author of Crokinole book with Barry Raymer

(Fulop/Raymer photo courtesy of Bill Gladding, Tavistock Gazette)

The fascination with Crokinole was fun, but short-lived for me.  I would have loved to stay all day, but I also had a number of places to visit before the day was done.  I left Tavistock and headed north to my next stop, about 3 miles away…

Shakespeare: This small and quaint little town is an antique lovers paradise.  I think there are maybe 750 people that reside in this town.  The town was founded in 1832 by David Bell, and used to be known as Bell’s Corner. The name changed from Bell’s Corner to Shakespeare in 1852 when Alexander Mitchell suggested naming the town after his
favorite playwright, William Shakespeare.

The old sign to Shakespeare & the Shakespeare Antique Centre

I really had no idea what I would run into in Shakespeare, but one shop (or
shoppe in Canadian) caught my eye….

Anything Funky with “stuff” or “junk” always catches my eye

What really caught my eye was the flamingos (being Sumoflam and
all….)

I met owner Terianne Miller, who work with the Stratford Shakespeare Festival for many years, recently opened this unique shop. She actually has aspirations of “flamingoizing” the shop.  Funky Junk was really a fresh shop and had some really reasonable prices.  In fact, I got one of the wire flamingoes as seen above.  The green ball actually has a
solar panel/light in it and lights up.  I got one for Julianne…for only $15!!



Bears Am I in Shakespeare, Ontario

A couple of doors down from Funky Junk was the Bears Am I shop. This shop is owned and operated by Bear artist and collector Sue Gueguen. Sue provides one of those fascination stories to me.  From the outside the shop appears to be one focused on selling teddy bears, etc.  But, the REAL story is that she makes many of the bears herself. She has been making them since she was 7 years old.  In 1989 she started doing her craft — making bears from real fur from old coats, etc.  She calls her hand-crafted (I prefer that over hand-made because these really are a craft!) bears “Powder Puff Teddies.”  Her bears are fully jointed, have German glass eyes and the noses are embroidered.   She spends hours on the bears.

Sue Gueguen hard at work hand-crafting one of her Powder Puff Teddies

The key to her work is that families bring in their old fur coats, or other fur items that they want to remember as an heirloom item. Sue has had folks bring her a number of types of furs.  She has even made a bear out of skunk fur!!

Sue shows a kangaroo skin that will soon become a bear. 

The bear on the right was made from raccoon fur.

Sue had a number of interesting stories and we had an enjoyable discussion. She really got a kick out of my story about the Trailer Park Troubadours song Aunt Beula’s Roadkill Overcoat.  For her benefit and yours, here is a picture of the overcoat from the 2008
Polyesterfest Cruise that the Troubs’ sponsor.

Aunt Beula’s Roadkill Overcoat

(photo courtesy of Jim Aspinwall)

Stratford: Not too far west of Shakespeare is the lovely town of Stratford. I cannot really do the town justice on this page, but will at least preview it. Since I will now be in Ontario until October, I plan on making a longer trip to Stratford for more exploration.  The town sits along the Avon River and there are some beautiful sites along the river in town. There are also fascinating buildings and lovely parks, including the famous Shakepearean Gardens, which I did not visit on this trip.



Some Stratford Scenes

Along the river there are a number of small boutiques and lots of small cafes.  But the most impressive part to me and what I really wanted to see was the swans on the Avon River.  The serenity of river along with the gracefulness of the swans provided me a peaceful feeling.

Swans on the Avon River

And I got the double pleasure of catching a young girl and her family interacting with the swans.  In fact, these swans are very tame and not afraid of individuals.  While I was taking photos one of the swans actually pecked at my feet, my pockets and hands.

I love the photo in the middle as they stare each other down.
It was a lucky shot!

Her mother and father enjoyed them as well


The ducks also wanted their day in the spotlight

St. Marys: The final leg of today’s trip took me into St. Marys, which in a sense was full circle as it is home to Canada’s Baseball Hall of Fame.   I found my way to the museum but had no time to go in.  I did get a couple of shots of the outside though.  Some of those inducted in the past include former Chicago Cubs pitcher Ferguson Jenkins; the first black ball player in the majors, Jackie Robinson; Andre Dawson from the Montreal Expos; former L.A. Dodgers manager Tommy LaSorda; and James “Tip” O’Neill, who became the namesake for the former U.S. Speaker of the House.


The Canadian
Baseball Hall of Fame in St. Marys, Ontario

More fascinating tome were the stone water tower, the waterfalls, and the lovely muraled youth center.  The stone water tower was built in 1899 and currently displays the slogan “St. Marys: The Town Worth Living In”.


St.Marys water tower and looking downtown


Waterfalls with scenic backdrop. Another angle of the church on the hill.



The St. Marys Youth Centre is totally surrounded by murals.  The art work is fabulous!!


I have tried to find more info on the artists, but have had no success


After my visit here, I headed back to Woodstock, took a shower and headed straight to Bright to attend the Walters Family Dinner Theatre Show.  You can see more on my page
about that visit here.