Synchronicity on a Saturday Night: Take 2 – UK Basketball & Antsy McClain

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Antsy McClain

Artwork by Antsy McClain (with some revision by Meadowlark Creative and Sumoflam added the colors and UK logo)

Artwork by Antsy McClain (with some revision by Meadowlark Creative and Sumoflam added the colors and UK logo) This is the “Go UK!” Sumoflam logo

Back in early April 2014 I wrote a post entitled “Synchronicity on a Saturday Night: UK Basketball & Antsy McClain“.  It was all about a Saturday night (April 4, 2014) when I attended an Antsy McClain concert in Harrison, OH and, on the same night, the Kentucky Wildcats were playing in the opening game of the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament against the University of Wisconsin.  I noted the synchronicity and a number of unique coincidences revolving around the whole evening of events. (And UK won on a last second three pointer by Aaron Harrison to advance to the finals – they lost to Wisconsin this year)

Antsy and Sumoflam at the SOLD OUT show in the intimate Downtowne Listening Room in Cincinnati

Antsy and Sumoflam at the SOLD OUT show in the intimate Downtowne Listening Room in Cincinnati

Almost one year later I was again in Cincinnati to see Antsy McClain (March 28, 2015) and, again, the UK Wildcats were battling it out against Notre Dame in the Elite 8.  And here I was, in my UK hat cheering on Antsy McClain at the intimate, yet wonderful DownTowne Listening Room in Downtown Cincinnati while the UK Wildcats were in yet again a barnstorming back and forth battle.

DownTowne Listening Room Cincinnati

DownTowne Listening Room Cincinnati

Antsy McClain SOLD OUT

Antsy McClain SOLD OUT

Antsy McClain at DownTowne Listening Room

Antsy McClain at DownTowne Listening Room

The DownTowne Listening Room is located on the second floor of the Art Deco Shillito Place Building in downtown Cincinnati.  With food (included with tickets) and couches and close seating, is a perfect place for a performer like Antsy McClain and other singer songwriters.

Shilito Building in downtown Cincinnati.  Home of the DownTowne Listening Room

Shilito Place Building in downtown Cincinnati. Home of the DownTowne Listening Room

Panorama shot of the DownTowne Listening Room

Panorama shot of the DownTowne Listening Room

Founder Scott Skeabeck is an avid music lover who moved to Cincinnati from Philadelphia about five years ago. As a frequent concert-goer and listening room patron on the East Coast, he was determined to bring the experience to Cincinnati.

DownTowne Listening Room founder Scott Skeabeck

DownTowne Listening Room founder Scott Skeabeck

View from the singer's mouth

View from the singer’s mouth

Scott Skeabeck knows how to book a good show and provide a great entertainment venue

Scott Skeabeck knows how to book a good show and provide a great entertainment venue

The show was opened by singer/songwriter Steve Saunders, who is from Cincinnati but originally from Paintsville, KY.  Much like Antsy, Steve is a storyteller with his music. He has been around for a while.  One of his close friends, Tommy Bolin, was with the James Gang in the 1970s and Steve was able to get to know one of my favorite musicians, Joe Walsh, as a result.  Steve’s rootsy music was good.  You should give him a listen on his ReverbNation site.

Opening for Antsy McClain was singer/songwriter Steve Saunders

Opening for Antsy McClain was singer/songwriter Steve Saunders

Cincinnati artist Steve Saunders at the DownTowne Listening Room

Cincinnati artist Steve Saunders at the DownTowne Listening Room

After Steve’s great performance of six or seven songs, it was Antsy McClain’s turn to give the crowd some unequivocal fun.  I have known and worked with Antsy for well over 20 years and it is rare to see him doing a solo show in such an intimate setting. He did a good number of his hits as well as some new things from his upcoming album “Somewhere Past These Gravel Roads,” which is scheduled to be out in June 2015.

Antsy's hand-written set list

Antsy’s hand-written set list

Antsy McClain singing one of his songs at DownTowne Listening room

Antsy McClain singing one of his songs at DownTowne Listening room

Here are a couple more shots of my friend Antsy McClain…all shot by me

Smiling Antsy McClain

Smiling Antsy McClain

Antsy sings a mean tune

Antsy sings a mean tune

Antsy McClain in B/W

Antsy McClain in B/W

The DownTowne Listening Room audience enjoying Antsy McClain

The DownTowne Listening Room audience enjoying Antsy McClain

As Antsy’s show finished just before the basketball game, I had the final couple of minutes on a screen in hand (thank you iPhone and NCAA-TV!!) Steve Saunders, also an avid Wildcat’s fan, joined me. Once again, with only a minute or so in the game, Aaron Harrison drops another 3 pointer and the Cats take the lead.  But, alas, Notre Dame comes back with their own.  UK then ties it and Notre Dame attempts to come back.

UK Basketball player, Sophomore Andrew Harrison

UK Basketball player, Sophomore Andrew Harrison

After what seemed like an eternity, UK stopped them and got the ball back.  Andrew Harrison, Aaron’s twin brother, drives the full court for a layup and gets fouled.  With just seconds he left he drops them both for a 2 point UK lead.  Notre Dame has a few seconds and one last chance and is again stopped, as UK gets their record-tieing 38th win of the season and was only two games away from an undefeated 40-0 season.  Unfortunately, on April 4 the Wildcats lost a heartbreaker to Wisconsin.

Antsy's Flamingo Capo

Antsy’s Flamingo Capo

As for me…on that Saturday night I was a double winner as Antsy’s show as awesome and I got to hang with one of my best friends, and the night was finished off with a UK Win.  Synchronicity rules.

After the show with Antsy McClain

After the show with Antsy McClain

Joshua Bell: A Classical Rock Star

joshuabell-1000x330What more can I say? After enjoying a wonderful concert with the University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, with accompanying guest classical superstar violinist Joshua Bell, I left inspired and starstruck!

Getting Pumped for the Concert

Getting Pumped for the Concert

I am not a music critic, but I am an avid music fan. Those that know me are aware that I am a 70s rock ‘n roller and an collector of cover songs. But, I grew up listening to classical music, I’ve married a classical violinist and I have classical music in my life and I enjoy it as well, and do include it in my collections.

Pre-concert photo with my sweetheart as we waited to be let in to the auditorium

Pre-concert photo with my sweetheart as we waited to be let in to the auditorium

Though not a critic, this is my review of the concert from April 3 based upon my experience with music.

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)

The UKSO opened with two luscious pieces. The first piece was a very delightful, indeed festive offering by Dmitri Shostakovich. Entitled “Festive Overture“, it is filled with catchy melodies and straightforward harmonies, perhaps a reflection of the Socialist regime’s push for simplicity in the 1950s. The piece started with with a grand brass fanfare, a perfect opening for a concert. Soon the tempo abruptly changed into high gear for the main theme, which included a bubbly clarinet tune. From there the pace of the music was breakneck and whimsical. I loved this opening piece and was only disappointed in its brevity.

Igor Stravinsky (1881-1972)

Igor Stravinsky (1881-1972)

I had not heard Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite in many years. I recall an old album my Dad had in the 1960s, conducted by Leopold Stokowski. I was not too endeared to it back in the 1960s.  In terms of classical I was more prone to listen to my Dad’s Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms albums. As I grew older and listened to it again in the 1970s, I enjoyed it more as I was able to understand the story that the music elicited about an evil king, a prince and a Firebird that saved the day. The UKSO performance, conducted by John Nardolillo, was moving.

UKSO Conductor John Nardilillo (photo from Lexington Herald Leader)

UKSO Conductor John Nardilillo (photo from Lexington Herald Leader)

Outside the rain was pouring buckets and, from my third row seat in the Singletary Center, I could hear it flowing down the side of the building.  This background “music” of the flowing water added to the mysteriously flowing stanzas of the seven movements.  After so many years of not listening to it, I was enthralled by all of the musical movement coming from the various sections.  But, I also had a great angle to catch a profile of Dr. Nardolillo and could see his amazing expressiveness. It was almost as if he were yelling out to the orchestra. It was obvious that he put his entire self into the music and not just his arms. Throughout the entire performance my eyes were glued on him as the music filled my ears. Indeed, it was an enjoyable piece and it was actually the first time I ever heard it performed live and I was grateful I had the opportunity.

Sitting in Row B at the Singletary Center...3rd Row and awesome place to sit

Sitting in Row B at the Singletary Center…3rd Row and awesome place to sit

After intermission, the highlight of the night was having the rare opportunity to see a world-class violinist perform. What made it even more fascinating and rare was knowing that Joshua Bell was performing with his 300 year old Gibson Stradivarius violin (named after one of its early owners, the English violinist George Alfred Gibson), which is valued at over $4 million. This antique violin was fabricated by Antonio Stradivari of Cremona in 1713.. The Gibson, while owned by Bronisław Huberman, was stolen twice. Read the complete story here.

Joshua Bell performs with UKSO (Photo by Andrew Brinkerhorst, UK Singletary Center)

Joshua Bell performs with UKSO (Photo by Andrew Brinkerhorst, UK Singletary Center)

Joshua Bell opened with Max Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor, which was written in 1866. This concerto, according to some, is one of the finest concertos in the violin repertoire. It is also considered to be the German composer’s finest score. Ironically, this was the same piece that Joshua Bell performed in his Carnegie Hall debut in 1985, when he was only 17. The flowing water coupled with the rumbling timpani and the smooth sounds of the woodwinds backing the soloist was an absolute delight.

Max Bruch (1838-1920)

Max Bruch (1838-1920)

And of course, Bell did not fail to impress.  He had passion written all over him in the amazing Bruch concerto. Once again, from my angle and close proximity I could see every facial crease, every smile of joy in his face and the look of contentment with this youthful college orchestra, which stepped up their game to match the intensity of the word renowned Joshua Bell. He was both colorful and provided all with a chance to hear the tones of his 300 year old violin.

Joshua Bell

Joshua Bell

The performance closed with a fantastic rendering of Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso in A minor by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns, which he wrote in 1863. This performance mixed excitement with the exotic.  The tune was colorful and lyrical and made me want to get up and dance gleefully (which I can’t imagine trying to do!!).  Bell’s fingers just rolled down the strings.

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Overall it was an amazing evening of music, despite the torrential weather outside.  Ny the time the concert had ended, so had the rains.  It was a cool and refreshing walk back to the parking lot as my wife’s dreams were fulfilled in seeing Joshua Bell and my soul was filled with delight from the whimsical and mysterious music that filled the Singletary Center for the Arts.