Countdown 365: #361- Growing Up in the Age of Technology

(Editor’s Note: As I approach age 60, I am “Counting My Many Blessings” by doing a daily countdown from 365. These are in no particular order, but, as you will see in days following, there is a method to the madness.)

Check out the 70s threads

Check out the 70s threads

I am a child of the late 50s, 60s and 70s (I know, its obvious right?).  I grew up in my youth with black and white TV (with three channels – ABC, NBC and CBS) and we needed “rabbit ears” on the TV or an antenna on the house for reception, 45 RPM records and players, telephones with dials on them (also called rotary phones), cars with roll down windows (not electric) and a bright headlamp switch on the floor, non-electric typewriters and Kodak Brownie cameras that used flashbulbs, to name a few of the things. We enjoyed listening to our Top 40 hits on wonderful new pocket sized transistor radios…AM only. There was no such thing as a Drive-thru restaurant.

 

Black and White TV

Black and White TV

Rabbit Ears antenna

Rabbit Ears antenna

Pocket Transistor Radio and earphone

Pocket Transistor Radio and earphone

Kodak Brownie

Kodak Brownie

An red rotary phone from the 1960's or 1970's.

A red rotary phone from the 1960s

A car window handle from the 1960s

A car window handle from the 1960s

Old Type Writer

Old Type Writer

45 RPM record player

45 RPM record player

Color TV Console

Color TV Console

 

Then life got exciting as I grew a bit older…technology was in action! We got a color TV Console with a STEREO record player. We got a station wagon with air conditioning and electric window openers! Kodak came out with Instamatic cameras – even little portable ones (which I actually used when I was on my LDS mission in Japan)!

 

A Ford Country Squire similar to the one we had (see the photo above with me in it)

A Ford Country Squire similar to the one we had (see the photo above with me in it)

Kodak Instamatic portable camera

Kodak Instamatic portable camera with 110mm film

Kodak Instamatic w/ 126mm film and a flashcube

Kodak Instamatic w/ 126mm film and a flashcube

Polaroid SX-70 Camera

Polaroid SX-70 Camera

With the late 1960s we saw the birth of the 8 track tape…no longer did we have to turn our records over. And we could listen to our music in the car instead of the radio. And the Polaroid SX-70 Camera was to die for! Instant high quality photos. Soon the 8 track was being replaced by cassette tapes that cold be plugged into portable units and eventually, by the early 1980s we could listen to them in stereo on a Sony Walkman.  We had wonderful FM radio stations that played full album sides in a luscious sound. And the IBM Selectric was the thing to write papers on instead of a pen and paper.

8 Track Tape version of Pink Floyd

8 Track Tape version of Pink Floyd’s “Animals

An 8 track player in Car

An 8 track player in Car

Folding 8 track player combo

Folding 8 track player combo

IBM Selectric

IBM Selectric

Computer Punch Card

Computer Punch Card

When I first registered for college computers were in use…by the schools.  We would fill out computer punch cards.  It was so cool to see technology in action.  My first two years of college saw the advent of a typewriter with memory and a built in eraser.  I could type and go back a few lines to erase if I needed to.

 

The good old floppy disk

The good old floppy disk

By the time I was in my 3rd year of college we had connectivity to the mainframe and could write our papers on a computer using Wordstar and storing them on a floppy disk. Color TVs were everywhere and rarely would we see a black and white TV.  And, I forgot to mention that we had video tapes to both watch movies or even record our own. Typewriters were still around but they too were fading away.  The 8 track tape was vintage but no longer available in stores.

When I began my Master’s program at Arizona State University in the mid-1980s we now had portable PCs to use.  Still no such thing as email.  I had a part time job with a Real Estate Auctioneer and he had a brand new cell phone that looked like and felt heavy as a brick. But I could call my wife while I was driving…so cool!  And I also worked at a call center for pagers.  People from all over the country would call in and leave messages that we would type in on pagers.

Taking a Selfie with iPhone in San Francisco in 2015

Taking a Selfie with iPhone in San Francisco in 2015

Back then I was really grateful for technology.  But, little did I know that almost everything would be on my iPhone…my 8 track player is now an music player (and can store hundreds of songs that can shuffle), my black and white TV is now a streaming device for my satellite TV at home, my typewriter is a voice activated writer with a name (Siri).  I don’t need floppies.  My device at 64 GB has more memory than the entire mainframe had when I was in college.  Don’t need a camera either.  I can now take real selfies, thank you. I now talk to my grandkids over the internet while looking at them. My mobile device also measures my steps, keeps my calendar, lets me look at the internet, takes my heart rate, keeps my phone directory and contact list.  And don’t get me started on social media like Facebook and Twitter and LinkedIn…and yes, I not only use them, but they are what I do to make a living!!  I don’t even need a printed boarding pass at the airport or card or cash at Starbucks…all done on my mobile device.

iPhone 6s Plus - will have one of these soon

iPhone 6s Plus

Needless to say, everything I need is on my device…my LDS Scriptures (and a gazillion other things), my photo albums, my credit cards, my email, my contact list, my to do list, my calendar, I can check the weather wherever I am, my phone can tell WHERE I am and even automatically “geotag” my photos, Twitter posts, Instagram photos, etc.

Speaking of social media, I didn’t mention that I first started using something called America Online in 1993…had my own email address. HA! Email!! (It was eventually sumoman@aol.com)  Then they came out with something called the internet…I could connect my computer via my phone and wait and maybe find something useful on the World Wide Web over AOL after hearing a man say “You’ve Got Mail” (which by the way was voiced by a guy named Elwood Edwards – see article)

A flat screen TV

A flat screen TV

Oh, and nowadays we have these wonderful flat screen color TVs with internet access, 100s of channels of programming.

Ultimately, I am grateful to have grown up through the age of technology.  I have seen men walk on the moon.  I have personally produced 100s of live broadcasts from football fields and gyms across the country over the internet.

And what does the current present hold in terms of technology?  Cars that back themselves up, driverless cars, remote control smart houses where devices can be turned on and off through a mobile device from 1000s of miles away.

It has been an amazing 59 years and I am so grateful to have lived through it all and seen so much.  I can’t even begin to imagine what more I may see in the next few years.  Will the iPhone Mobile Device (or the Samsung Android Device) become an antiquated thing of the past that my children will be saying “I can remember when?”

Over the next year I may focus on few of the technologies that have had profound impact on my life.  But, the massively overwhelming changes – (records –> 8 track –> cassette –> CD –> DVD –> MP3 player –> Mobile devices  for instance) have made life amazing.  And certainly worth counting my blessings.

minority_report

#TBT Special – 2001: A Space Odyssey with Live Orchestra & Chorus

imageLast weekend I had the unique opportunity to attend a historic event at the Singletary  Center at the University of Kentucky. The 1970s movie “2001: A Space Odyssey” was shown on a big screen. Along with that was a live orchestra and a live chorus that performed all of the music in the movie and they only played the vocal tracks of the movie to the sound system.  For me, this was a real “Throwback” to days gone by.

UK Orchestra and 2001

The UK Orchestra prepares for the live performance of 2001: A Space Odyssey. The huge movie screen sits above them.

It has been nearly 30 years since I last saw this movie and I had only seen it one time before that when it first came out in the 1970s. I have always been a Stanley Kubrick fan (my faves are 2001, The Shining and A Clockwork OrangeI actually wrote a final exam analysis in a class in college on Clockwork in 1982 and got an A+). I could give a review of the 2001, but it is had thousands of reviews that are mush better than I could do. (see some HERE)

With Julianne to see 2001

With Julianne to see 2001: A Space Odyssey with LIVE Orchestra

Many call this movie one of the greatest movies of all time (#22 on IMDB, #26 on Filmsite.org, #22 on AMC#22 on American Film Institute, #43 on France’s Cahiers du Cinema, #10 by famed film critic Roger Ebert). And in terms of its artistic fashion, the unique and sometimes complexly strange subject matter, and the way that cupric filmed the movie was indeed amazing.

Sumoflam at 2001

Sumoflam with the program for the production

But, never before have I seen a movie with LIVE music (other than an old silent Charlie Chaplin film with a Wurlitzer), especially a full orchestra and a chorus. Indeed, the chorus alone was amazing because of the type of singing that they were required to do. Each individual had unique tones and there were many dissonant chords. They were singing the parts for the sound of the monolith, the big black rectangular monolith of the movie.

2001space043The University of Kentucky had a detailed article about the movie and its setup HERE. This program has been presented by an exclusive selection of the world’s greatest orchestras including the London Philharmonia Symphony, The New York Philharmonic, The Brussels Symphony, and the National Symphony. (See a review of the performance by the New York Philharmonic at the Lincoln Center in 2013). The UK Symphony Orchestra and UK Chorale received the prestigious honor of being the first university ensembles to perform this concert.

According to the article:

To be prepared for such a different concert, UK Chorale had to develop its own rehearsal methods beyond just screening the film. “2001” calls for approximately 20 individual sounds from the vocalists performed in a group. In order to be ready to sing the notes given to them, members of UK Chorale practiced not only as a group but often individually with their smart phones and metronome apps that helped them properly time their individual parts.”

Then there was the complexity of the orchestra and chorus matching the movie in proper synchronization.

2001 Equipment

Big projection system and massive sound system were brought in for this special presentation

I also understand that the school had to bring in lots of equipment for the unique and amazing sound system that reverberated through the hall. In fact, one of the staff members noted that it required “special projectors and sound systems that [they] had to scour the United States to find, and did find them.”

György Ligeti (1923-2006)

György Ligeti (1923-2006)

The music, which included the spooky and eerily dissonant chords of Hungarian composer György Ligeti’s “Atmospheres played live to the film and the haunting “Jupiter and Beyond: Requiem for Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano, 2 Mixed Choirs” also by Ligeti (see more about him HERE) were absolutely stunning.

2001-a-space-odyssey-originalUltimately this was a maximum sensory experience in all ways. There is nothing better than a live orchestra with a movie. It was absolutely an amazing experience. Totally phenomenal.  Kudos to the UK Orchestra and conductor John Nardolillo as well as the UK Chorale and conductor Jefferson Johnson for a spectacular performance!!

Media #TBT – Arizona Living Magazine 1983

My first real dream job - being a tour guide in Flagstaff in 1983

My first real dream job – being a tour guide in Flagstaff in 1983

In the early 1980s I was a tour guide for a company called Nava-Hopi Tours in Flagstaff, Arizona.  I was blessed with the opportunity to take hundreds of people all over northern Arizona to places like Monument Valley, the Navajo and Hopi Reservations, Sedona and a number of national parks and monuments. (more about this on my Less Beaten Paths Blog in a #TBT special post)

In 1983 I had a writer named Lea Lundberg from Arizona Living Magazine take a tour with us and she wrote a nice 2 page spread about it, including a number of quotes from me.  Following is a Flipbook with the actual article from July 1983. (Note that I am using a demo version of Flipbook Software, so there will be an obnoxious ad in the middle…)

[flipbook id=”1″]

A Christmas Message for 2014

As a current awesome father (according to my kids) and now a helluva grandfather, there is nothing better than Christmas with children. I am so blessed to be a grandfather to nine lovely children.

Christmas 2012 with my nine grandchildren

Christmas 2012 with my nine grandchildren

My daughter Marissa recently put together a wonderful video with my grandchildren.  It is a beautiful Christmasy video and expresses the joy better than I can in words.  Please watch it and share it and use #sharethegift

Livin’ the Dream – Following the Reinvention of Myself

Last week I put up a post on my Less Beaten Paths travel blog noting how writing that blog lead to a reinvention of myself and my career path (and also celebrating that blog’s 50,000th visit). This post is a follow-up to that one and I do it on my Sumoflam’s Singlewide blog because it’s not really associated with travel (though I do note some travel things in here….let’s face it, its in my blood).

Livin' the Dream

Living the Dream – masking Antsy McClain

I have called this “Livin’ the Dream” as that is the best way for me to express what my current career situation is for me.  I have gone from nightmares to living the dream and doing what I am passionate about.

DreamJob1To me, a “dream job” does not necessarily mean a job that provides tons of income, but rather a job that provides satisfaction and doing what I love doing. Don’t get me wrong, income is necessary and more of it is better.  But doing what I love while earning money to do it…now THAT is a Dream Job!

My fist real dream job - being a tour guide in Flagstaff in 1983

My first real dream job – being a tour guide in Flagstaff in 1983

Over the years, I have had a number of dream jobs. Perhaps my first was working as a tour guide in Flagstaff, Arizona in the early 1980s.I drove vans and buses and took tourists all over the beautiful locations of northern Arizona to places like Sedona, Monument Valley, the Navajo and Hopi Indian reservations, the Petrified Forest, Sunset Crater, and many other fabulous locations including the Grand Canyon. I met wonderful people, saw beautiful scenery year around, and I truly had a great time.

Working as a Tour Guide with visitors from the Isle of Man on the Navajo Reservation in 1983

Working as a Tour Guide with visitors from the Isle of Man on the Navajo Reservation in 1983

It was not until the late 1980s when we had an opportunity to go to Japan as a family that I was able to experience my next “Dream Job.” After graduation from Arizona State University with a Master’s Degree in Political Science/International Relations, I landed a position through the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program (JET Program) to work for the Oita Prefecture Government as a Coordinator for International Relations (CIR).  In fact, I was one of 32 Charter CIRs in the first year of the JET Program, which also brought nearly 500 Americans, Canadians and British to Japan to teach English.  This was my second “dream job” as I once again got to work with people from all walks of life from different parts of the world as they visited Oita and I got to travel, I did TV shows and had a wonderful two years on that gig (as well as an additional 2 years with Asahi Solar Corporation. My children were in TV commercials and all of these were a result of that particular position.

I served as interpreter, guide and host for then British Foreign Minister Sir Geoffrey Howe (L) and Oita's Governor Morihikio Hiramatsu (R) in 1987

I served as interpreter, guide and host for then British Foreign Minister Sir Geoffrey Howe (L) and Oita’s Governor Morihikio Hiramatsu (R) in 1987

I spent three days as host, guide and interpreter for famed Olympian from Romania Nadia Comaneci

I spent three days as host, guide and interpreter for famed Olympian Gymnast from Romania Nadia Comaneci

I did many TV shows while in Oita.  This was in Bungo Taketa at a famous Samurai museum.  I have the authentic swords used by the samurai as I presented a show (in Japanese) about this historical site.

I did many TV shows while in Oita. This was in Bungo Taketa at a famous Samurai museum. I have the authentic swords used by the samurai as I presented a show (in Japanese) about this historical site.

I was a co-host for a New Year's Celebration program in Oita in Jan. 1989.  Here I am with the camera man prepping fr the show.

I was a co-host for a New Year’s Celebration program in Oita in Jan. 1989. Here I am with the camera man prepping fr the show.

Upon returning from Japan in 1991, I struggled to find gainful employment for quite a while and ended up doing a lot of Japanese translation work and other work related to my Japanese language skills. Though very skilled in Japanese, I believe that I went through a “burnout stage” because of all of what I was doing. Indeed, it was a Japanese-related position that brought the family to Kentucky in 1993.

Japanese interpreting at the Toyota Plan in Woodstock, Ontario, Canada in 2008

Japanese interpreting at the Toyota Plan in Woodstock, Ontario, Canada in 2008

Nevertheless, it was interesting to work in manufacturing plants such as the big Toyota plant in Georgetown, Kentucky (1997) and the Toyota plant in Woodstock, Ontario (2008). I worked in a number of parts manufacturers plants as well. Learning the manufacturing process was quite enlightening. In between a couple of those jobs, I worked on a Japanese-owned horse farm (which was beautiful) and I also spent a number of years working at Lexmark where I thrived on the job, but I would never call them “dream jobs.” The best part of the job at Lexmark was the opportunity I had to travel to Cebu in the Philippines (where I trained my eventual replacements!).

Island Hopping in the Philippines

Island Hopping in the Philippines

On a boat off of Mactan Island in the Philippines with "Team Higante", the crew I was training in 2006

On a boat off of Mactan Island in the Philippines with “Team Higante”, the crew I was training in 2005

The trips to Cebu (which altogether totaled about 7 weeks) were definitely one of the best parts of the job. Despite the daily work routines, I spent many evenings and every weekend traveling around Cebu and other islands.  In fact, my first real trip journals (which lead to my travel blogging) were borne out of these trips (check out these early trip reports). Little did I know back then what my travel writing would do for me!

Sumoflam squeezed into an outrigger canoe on a small island north of Cebu.

Sumoflam squeezed into an outrigger canoe on a small island north of Cebu.

With friends in a Jeepney in Cebu

With friends in a Jeepney in Cebu

After Lexmark I did more Japanese work and eventually made my way to Ontario (which I noted above).  I really did not enjoy the translating work, but it brought income.  The best part was the travel to and from home every two weeks.  I took a different route each time, took lots of photos and wrote lots of trip journals (see them here).

Japanese trainers in Sparta, Ontario on a Sumoflam led "tour" of Southern Ontario

Japanese trainers in Sparta, Ontario on a Sumoflam led “tour” of Southern Ontario

My little home away from home in Paris, Ontario in 2008

My little home away from home in Paris, Ontario in 2008

After my Ontario gig ended, I spent nine months in a job that was a literal hell for me.  I worked as a call center rep for Sprint, then Boost Mobile, then Apple.  I hated the jobs…low paying, low morale and no challenge.  I sought for opportunities to leave at every corner.  And, then in 2009 it finally happened.

Working a baseball game for iHigh.com

Working a baseball game for iHigh.com

My next real “dream job” evolved from being hired by iHigh.com in 2009. I have always enjoyed working in web design and web related services. I have also always enjoyed working with people. And, furthermore, I have loved working in things related to sports, especially high school sports. As a result, my position became one of great passion and enjoyment. Indeed, I did not even take a vacation for almost 3 years. My job was practically a vacation.The job also included a great deal of travel and meeting with people at high schools around the country. I got to do broadcast work which I enjoyed immensely.

Polo Cross at the Kentucky Horse Park - we broadcast a number of Pony Club events.  Was great fun.

Polo Cross at the Kentucky Horse Park – we broadcast a number of Pony Club events. Was great fun.

I traveled to many locations to broadcast BMX Races and took many photos, like this one.

I traveled to many locations to broadcast BMX Races and took many photos, like this one.

As part of my iHigh work I was responsible for the USA Swimming partnership and got to attend the Olympic Trials and broadcast some events.  I a interviewing multi medalist Kaitlin Sandeno

As part of my iHigh work I was responsible for the USA Swimming partnership and got to attend the Olympic Trials and broadcast some events. I a interviewing multi medalist Kaitlin Sandeno

I participated in the FFA National events and helped manage broadcasts of this huge event in Indianapolis

I participated in the FFA National events and helped manage broadcasts of this huge event in Indianapolis

That dream job came to an abrupt end on November 2, 2012. At that time the company had made some major decisions in the business direction and the shifts left both my wife and myself unemployed as we did not fit into the new program.I was devastated as my “dream job” had fallen out from underneath me.

Had to Ponder the Future

Had to Ponder the Future

From the time I lost that position in 2012 through 2013 I struggled again to find any full-time employment. And that is where my previous post begins and how I have participated in the “reinvention of myself” and my skill sets.

Resilience in hard times is always best

Resilience in hard times is always best

I like to think of myself as being resilient. I have learned to adapt to change and always try to take a positive angle towards it despite any challenges, frustrations, hurdles, etc.I also make a great effort to not burn bridges along the way and to do a good job wherever I am up until the last day.

Working with VYPE

So, this reinvention of myself and my skill sets led me to learn the WordPress CMS through my travel blog and then through this blog and others. Relations that I had created such as those at VYPE.com brought me work and I was able to continue to build on the foundation that I had learned through my blog. With VYPE.com I worked with a developer and helped build the entire network after VYPE left iHigh and had to build their own network.and now, for over a year, I have worked with them and manage their entire Web structure which is all based on the WordPress platform. Through them I picked up other work and through other connections I picked up even more work to where I now have number of clients and I was working from home. I was doing things that I enjoy as putting together websites is just a form of creativity that I seem to thrive at.

Working with Antsy McClain

Working with Antsy McClain

With the freedom of working from home, I have reestablished the management of a number of websites I had done in the past. One of these was moving my good friend and well-known singer/songwriter/recording artist/graphic artist Antsy McClain’s website into the WordPress platform.  I once again manage this for him and work closely in his promotion. Indeed, this has been part of “Living the Dream” as I remain in the music industry, something I had dreamed about as a high school student.

On tour with Antsy McClain in San Francisco in the early 2000s

On tour with Antsy McClain in San Francisco in the early 2000s

Then, in early September I got “The Call.” I had been doing some work with my former boss at iHigh.com who now runs a multimedia company called BlueMillion.com. Blue Million is a digital technology and marketing company specializing in social media, digital marketing, and live video to online and mobile audiences around the world. Through this work, he called me from the offices of iHigh, Inc., which runs the Great American Rivalry Series.

Working with the Great American Rivalry Series

Working with the Great American Rivalry Series

This company used to be a sister company of iHigh.com, but recently split away as iHigh.com moved to VolarVideo. I was asked to use my web skills and social media skills to be their “Control Central” during football season. This has literally brought me full circle as I am now working out of the old iHigh Office on Mondays and Fridays and then from home during the week.  Like the days of iHigh, I watch and monitor high school football from the office on Friday nights.  I get to work with many of the high school coaches and broadcast organizations of the past as well. I count this both as an immense blessing and a recognition for my devoted hard work ethic.

Wearing two hats (OK, a hat and a shirt) as I am full swing into high school sports again.

Wearing two hats (OK, a hat and a shirt) as I am full swing into high school sports again.

Coupled with this, I have partnered with Fieldhouse Media Group as their Web Manager (and as an extension I am the Digital Media Coordinator for VYPE.com, part of FMG now). I work with many wonderful people. As a result of this work, I am once again working with a number of broadcast groups across the country and am able to bring them on to the VYPE network as partners.

David&Tui

Sumoflam with Texas author and blogger Tui Snider

Another wonderful “dream fulfiller” which originated with my blog writing was “meeting” other bloggers, photographers and writers. They have all inspired me in so many ways that I will continue to “reinvent” myself and move towards writing some books about travel the back roads of America…an extension of my blog. (Shown above is Tui Snider, author of two books recently and blogs at Mental Mosaic).

A couple of others that have become an inspiration:

Derek Ace a professional photogapher...does amazing work.  We met at Hells Half Acre in Wyoming in May 2014

Derek Ace, a professional photographer…does amazing work. We met at Hells Half Acre in Wyoming in May 2014 (See some of his work on Facebook)

A video about Minnesota Travel Writer Seth Hardmeyer, who does the Highway Highlights blog about Minnesota (and beyond).  We have shared many inspirational stories and places.  He has been an inspiration.

The Dream Job is here and better than ever. Its not about the money, its about the doing what you enjoy and excel at. I now have a photo blog, a photo site on National Geographic and have become a member of the Professional Travel Bloggers Association  Life is Good!

Life is Good

Life is Good

Julianne and David celebrate 35 years together

My daughter Marissa compiled this look back at our 35 years of “merried” life.

This video includes music by my good friends Antsy McClain and Anthony Snape and also a touching song by Joe Walsh.

The Internet and Me on the 30th Birthday of the Mac

Apple Logo 1984

Apple Logo 1984

Today is the 30th birthday of the Mac computer.  When it first came out in 1984, I was a senior in college in  Flagstaff, AZ. Little did any of us truly understand where we would be 30 years later with computers, the internet and mobile devices.

Indeed, 1984 was NOT like George Orwell’s 1984.

As I write this today in 2014, the computers and the Internet have become major factors in my life and the life of millions of others in the world (but I am still using a PC at home….can’t afford a Mac….). But I can recall when it wasn’t always that way. Indeed, I can recall when there was no such thing as the Internet. There was no such thing as networked computers either.  Even before I knew much about it, there was already some discussion.  Here is a news video from 1981 (from wimp.com) about what would later become known as the World Wide Web….

My first real interaction with computers didn’t occur until1986 when I was working on my Masters Thesis at Arizona State University. I was connected to a large mainframe (which had less memory than my iPhone today) and wasusing a black screen with colored text and using a program called WordStar which was only attached through the network.  I had to save everything to the network.

WordStar Screen

WordStar Screen

In the midst of my work on it, the first portable computers started arriving at the school. I can remember when a Compaq portable computer arrived at our computer lab. iI was kind of bulky, but it was portable nonetheless. Back in those days, we had to use DOS commands to move around and do things. With the new Compaq computers, we were able to save our content on a floppy disk. It was one of those real floppy disks…they were big, about 7 inches, and floppy.

Compaq portable computer

Compaq portable computer ca 1985

A 7" Floppy Disk that we used to save data on the Compaqs and other machines

A 7″ Floppy Disk that we used to save data on the Compaqs and other machines

This certainly revolutionized how school papers were written, for we no longer needed to use a typewriter (such as the IBM Selectric shown below) with auto correct on it, I could use a computer and never have to print anything out until I was ready. Boy was that cool back then! (As a side note, I never dreamed at that time that I would eventually work at Lexmark in the 1990s, which was born out of the IBM Selectric group!!)

IBM Selectric II

IBM Selectric II

By 1987 I was on my way to Japan to work for the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program (JET Programme).  When I got there, they were still not using computers, but they did have a couple of “WaPro – short for WordProcessors” with convoluted keyboards. for all the Japanese characters. By the time I left in 1991, the “Internet” was available, but it was more like a bulletin board and I had to go to the local Nikkei Shinbun (Japanese version of Wall Street Journal) office in order to search anything. Looking back I can certainly see that it was a precursor to the Internet.

A Toshiba NWS-800 1987 "WaPro" as I saw them

A Toshiba NWS-800 1987 “WaPro” as I saw them

My first real experience with the Internet came when I got a membership to America Online (now known as AOL). (See AOL today) Yes, those people that were around in the 1990s probably remember seeing America Online floppy disks and CDs everywhere in every store and everywhere you went. (I wonder if anyone has kept one as a souvenir??) Seems like at that time everybody became an AOL member and they were able to send email back-and-forth to each other. We were starting to see online apps available and the Internet started to come of age.

AOL Logo circa 1990s

AOL Logo circa 1990s

AOL Floppy - 50 hours for free

AOL Floppy – 50 hours for free

AOL CD 100 Hours free

AOL CD 100 Hours free

Of course, we didn’t have high speed connections back then either.  We paid a high premium to the telephone company to get a 56K modem to hook to the telephone line.  When we were online, we couldn’t receive calls. Initially they were boxes we plugged in, but eventually you could get one added into a slot in the computer and then plugged the telephone line into it.

56K Modem Box

56K Modem Box

56K modem card for plugging into computer

56K modem card for plugging into computer

I can remember how cool it was looking up information on a browser through AOL. I even use the Internet for the first time in the 1990s to plan a trip when we had Barbara from France staying with us. Not everyplace was on the Internet at that time, but I was able to get maps and able to find some information about some places.

AOL Screen 1993

AOL Screen 1993

Windows developed Internet Explorer and a company named Netscape soon provided an alternative to the AOL browser. And search engines were born as well. Back then, before Google, there was AltaVista, which made searching for things on the youthful internet so much easier. I remember using it when I worked for Green Gates Farm as their office manager. Keeneland had just gotten their website up and running at that time. And we were able to look at the schedules and some of the other things. But Internet browsing was still a bit sketchy and things would go down.

AltaVista Search Engine ca. 1999

AltaVista Search Engine ca. 1999

By the late 1990s I was working as a contractor at Toyota and I experienced my first job working as a computer tech. I was originally hired to manage the printer configurations for Toyota’s Japanese printers, due in part to my work at Green Gates where I had to learn to configure our Lexmark printer to work with an HP Printer Driver (once again, at that time I had no idea that I would eventually end up at Lexmark!!). I soon started learning networking and at the same time the Internet started getting more and more capable. Internet Explorer had became the main browser as Windows grew. By this time AltaVista had been purchased by Yahoo!. Google wasn’t even really much of an entity at that time, though it had been created in 1998.

Despite all of this growth, it seems to me that the main use of the Internet at that time was still being able to email back-and-forth. AOL was still a big thing and everybody loved to hear that “you’ve got mail” whenever they would check their mail.

Since then, the Internet has blossomed.  It is everywhere.  We have mobile devices that access the internet.  I eventually worked at Lexmark, which was borne out of IBM.  I was basically working on the forefront of InkJet printer technology, which boomed in the 1990s but has since faded away.  Lexmark no longer manufactures inkjets and there are only a few companies that do.

Lexmark Inkjet - I actually oversaw the Software testing for this printer

Lexmark Inkjet – I actually oversaw the Software testing for this printer

Today Yahoo! still thrives, but is no longer the “big guy” out there.  That is now Google…indeed, the world seems to have become a GooglePlex….

YahooGoogleAnd of course, what of the 30 year old Mac? Apple is one of the biggest companies in the world and from the invention of iPods (for music) to mobile phones and now “mobile devices” such as an iPhone and an iPad, Apple too has come on its own.  I have a Dell laptop with Windows, but also have my own iPad and iPhone and can’t live without them….

Apple iPad

Apple iPad

Apple iPhone 5s with Internet Screens showing

Apple iPhone 5s with Internet Screens showing

We have come a long way in 30 years!!

David in 1984 at NAU Graduation

David in 1984 at NAU Graduation

David at Lexmark office after losing a bet on a high school football game

David at Lexmark office after losing a bet on a high school football game

David 2014 - Grandfather of nine and photo taken with mobile device and posted to the internet without a modem!

David 2014 – Grandfather of nine and photo taken with mobile device and posted to the internet without a modem!

Today, I work as a WordPress specialist and an internet Broadcast specialist.  I write three blogs.  I worked for a DotCom company (iHigh.com) for four years. I worked for a Printer Company.  I have done Network support. I have worked in a call center providing technical support for Mac users and iPhone users. Indeed, I eat, drink and sleep with the internet and derive 100% of my income from internet related work.  Its amazing what a History degree and Political Science Master’s degree will get you.  I never imagined I would be where I am today….but I am still a geek!!

Apple Logo 2014

Apple Logo 2014